Scarborough’s Elsa the Elm, estimated to be 190 years old, was cut down Saturday and will now be turned into arts and crafts to raise money for the town’s tree program. Interested artists can call 730-4150. Also, a town committee is holding a “How Old is Elsa?” contest, with entry forms available at the polls on Election Day, Nov. 8, for $1. The winner will receive a piece of the tree. The town hopes to plant another tree in Elsa’s place, with a rededication ceremony planned for October 2012. (Photos by Rich Obrey)

A giant crane dwarfs Elsa as crews from Bartlett Tree Services
and Scarborough Public Works prepare to bring the large elm down on
Saturday morning.
A giant crane dwarfs Elsa as crews from Bartlett Tree Services
and Scarborough Public Works prepare to bring the large elm down on
Saturday morning.
A late-setting moon watches over the shoulder of Allen Gaddy, a
licensed Maine arborist from Bartlett Tree Services, as he removes
Elsa’s limbs high over Route 1 at Oak Hill on Saturday.
Chris Pallotta from the Scarborough Public Works Department
loads large sections of the elm into a dump truck for transport to
Hillside Lumber, where it will be milled.
Allen Gaddy, a licensed Maine arborist from Bartlett Tree
Services, watches from his bucket as one of Elsa’s limbs is lowered
to the ground at Oak Hill on Saturday.
A scale in the crane indicated the large lower trunk of Elsa the
Elm weighed 12,000 pounds as it was lowered onto a trailer for
transport.
If Elsa’s rings could talk…
Allen Gaddy, a licensed Maine arborist from Bartlett Tree
Services, leans away as a large limb pops loose after being cut on
Saturday.
Allen Gaddy, a licensed Maine arborist from Bartlett Tree
Services, as he removes Elsa’s limbs high over Route 1 at Oak Hill
on Saturday.
Allen Gaddy, a licensed Maine arborist from Bartlett Tree
Services, watches the last-standing section of Elsa – the huge
trunk – is cut off the stump beside Route 1 at Oak Hill on
Saturday.
The last-standing section of Elsa – the huge trunk – is lifted
off the stump beside Route 1 at Oak Hill on Saturday.
A large back-up chainsaw is moved into place as Noah Tucker, a
licensed Maine arborist from Bartlett Tree Services, makes the
final cuts in the last-standing section of Elsa – the huge trunk –
beside Route 1 at Oak Hill on Saturday.


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