LOGAN BAUMLI, 12, uses her laptop to catch up on homework Oct. 1 before her cheerleading class at American Kicks Gym on Royalsborough Road in Durham. Logan is a “senior rascal,” which is a term used for the different age-levels among the cheerleaders. The youngest are called minis and they are pre-Kindergarten age. This week Logan plans to help out with the Q97.9 Bottle Drive “Cans For A Cure for Cancer.”

LOGAN BAUMLI, 12, uses her laptop to catch up on homework Oct. 1 before her cheerleading class at American Kicks Gym on Royalsborough Road in Durham. Logan is a “senior rascal,” which is a term used for the different age-levels among the cheerleaders. The youngest are called minis and they are pre-Kindergarten age. This week Logan plans to help out with the Q97.9 Bottle Drive “Cans For A Cure for Cancer.”

TWINS Michaela Wright, right, and Marissa Wright are freshmen at Morse High School in Bath. They enjoyed a quiet moment in the park between St. Paul’s Episcopal Church and the Curtis Memorial Library while waiting for their mom last Wednesday morning in Brunswick. The girls both play field hockey and basketball for Morse, as well as participate in track and field events. Michaela decided to wear a dress Wednesday so it would be easier to change on the bus en route to the away game in field hockey. The sisters say they often feel a sense of ESP (extrasensory perception) and have a very close bond, as many twins are known to. Finishing each other’s sentences and feeling a sense of dread if they cannot find each other in a crowd is common, they said. “It’s like she’s my baby and I get a real anxiety attack if I think I’ve lost her,” said Michaela, who was born one minute after her sister.

TWINS Michaela Wright, right, and Marissa Wright are freshmen at Morse High School in Bath. They enjoyed a quiet moment in the park between St. Paul’s Episcopal Church and the Curtis Memorial Library while waiting for their mom last Wednesday morning in Brunswick. The girls both play field hockey and basketball for Morse, as well as participate in track and field events. Michaela decided to wear a dress Wednesday so it would be easier to change on the bus en route to the away game in field hockey. The sisters say they often feel a sense of ESP (extrasensory perception) and have a very close bond, as many twins are known to. Finishing each other’s sentences and feeling a sense of dread if they cannot find each other in a crowd is common, they said. “It’s like she’s my baby and I get a real anxiety attack if I think I’ve lost her,” said Michaela, who was born one minute after her sister.