BERLIN — Microsoft may soon be one of the first U.S. cloud-computing companies to let Europeans store their online data closer to home, a response to fears that U.S. data centers are more vulnerable to snooping by the U.S. government.

The company said Wednesday it will give German customers the option of storing their data in centers it plans to build in Germany. The option will be available next year.

European consumers, privacy advocates and lawmakers have cited reports based on leaks by former NSA contractor Edward Snowden to claim that data stored by U.S. companies isn’t safe from U.S. government eavesdropping. Such concerns pose a threat to firms such as Microsoft, Google and Amazon, whose business model is increasingly built around data storage and so-called cloud services such as Microsoft’s Office 365.

Microsoft’s chief executive said the company will start next year using data centers in Magdeburg and Frankfurt that are managed by T-Systems, a subsidiary of Deutsche Telekom.

“These data centers will ensure that customers’ data remains in Germany and that a German company controls access to data in accordance with German law,” Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella said at a presentation in Berlin.


Only subscribers are eligible to post comments. Please subscribe or to participate in the conversation. Here’s why.

Use the form below to reset your password. When you've submitted your account email, we will send an email with a reset code.