STEPH GRANT, above, spins wool into yarn out of hand-dyed wool from her own sheep that she raises on Hawthorn and Thistle Farmstead in Washington. She’s “off-the-grid,” living in a yurt and running the farm all by herself. She also knits hats and sweaters with the yarn she crafts, along with selling her own mutton meat. “It’s a big deal for people to understand where wool comes from,” she said. “Clothing and what we put on our bodies is just as important as what we put into them.” EMILY COHEN / THE TIMES RECORD

STEPH GRANT, above, spins wool into yarn out of hand-dyed wool from her own sheep that she raises on Hawthorn and Thistle Farmstead in Washington. She’s “off-the-grid,” living in a yurt and running the farm all by herself. She also knits hats and sweaters with the yarn she crafts, along with selling her own mutton meat. “It’s a big deal for people to understand where wool comes from,” she said. “Clothing and what we put on our bodies is just as important as what we put into them.” EMILY COHEN / THE TIMES RECORD

On Tuesdays and Fridays from May to November, a dozen stands pop up on the Mall between Maine Street and Park Row in downtown Brunswick, forming the Brunswick Farmers’ Market. They sell more than greens, as vendors range from cheesemongers to bakers to artisans, but they all have the same goal — spread their passion for their goods. People come back each week and get to know the vendors. The friendly, neighborly feel of the market is driven home by the fact that some of the vendors are practically neighbors, from just down the road in Topsham or Bowdoinham.

LATE-SEASON strawberries from Fairwinds Farm for sale at Brunswick Farmers’ Market.

LATE-SEASON strawberries from Fairwinds Farm for sale at Brunswick Farmers’ Market.

EMILY COHEN /THE TIMES RECORD

EMILY COHEN /THE TIMES RECORD

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