BRUNSWICK POLICE on Monday seized three goats from a condemned residence at 1024 River Road, the same location where they removed 44 dogs on Aug. 10. BRUNSWICK POLICE DEPARTMENT PHOTO

BRUNSWICK POLICE on Monday seized three goats from a condemned residence at 1024 River Road, the same location where they removed 44 dogs on Aug. 10. BRUNSWICK POLICE DEPARTMENT PHOTO

BRUNSWICK

Brunswick police on Monday seized three goats from the River Road residence where they earlier this month removed 44 dogs, and charged two more people with animal abuse.

Police executed a search warrant Aug. 10 at the home of Robert and Nancy Enman of 1024 River Road and found the dogs and a bird living in squalid conditions.

Brunswick Police Cmdr. Mark Waltz said Tuesday that the investigating officer, Kerry Wolongevicz, found Robert and Nancy Enman at the home cleaning Monday. They hadn’t been at home during the Aug. 10 search, and were on vacation in California, according to court documents. Wolongevicz charged them with a series of Class D misdemeanors including cruelty to animals, failing to give an animal humanely clean conditions, provide proper indoor shelter, necessary medical attention or necessary sustenance.

Police already had charged Kyle Enman, Robert and Nancy’s son, and Kyle’s wife, Diana Enman, with the same crimes on Aug. 10, but investigators hinted at the time that more charges could be filed against others allegedly involved in the operation.

All four Enmans are scheduled to appear in West Bath District Court on Nov. 6.

Police had the 44 dogs and the bird taken from the property, but left the goats.

State animal welfare program agents gave Kyle Enman a notice requiring him to provide care to the goats, including food and water. He also was told to trim the animals’ hooves within 30 days.

Waltz said Wolongevicz became more worried about the three male goats at the Enman property after she allegedly found them without food and water while visiting the site over the weekend. She filed for an order of animal possession in West Bath District Court, which was granted by a judge.

In an affidavit, Detective William Moir documents several occasions police checked on the goats between Aug. 15 and Aug. 19. In most cases, they found no food sources to supplement the hay the goats had access to.

“It is hoped immediate seizure of the three above described goats be granted by the court to ensure their proper health and welfare,” the affidavit states. “This is based on reports of no water or food being regularly maintained for the goats and the additional concern the smallest goat … is not allowed access to food or water (when provided) by (a larger goat) continuously ramming it away.”

Moir added that if the goats were being provided food, police didn’t believe it was enough to sustain all three.

Waltz said Brunswick police and a Maine animal welfare agent seized the goats Monday afternoon.

On the day of the Aug. 10 search, Brunswick Deputy Fire Chief Jeff Emerson, the town’s health officer, found multiple fire and life safety issues, including electrical deficiencies and egress concerns. He condemned the home due to sanitation concerns, and because he felt the house was unsafe for human habitation.

“There was an abundance of feces and urine,” Emerson said last week.

Court documents show that at the time police conducted the search of the home, Robert and Nancy Enman were reportedly on vacation in California.

Wolongevicz said last week that it seemed most of the 44 dogs seized lived indoors, and few consistently went outside. The dogs were in crates stacked three or four high, she said.

There was a flea infestation, and dogs had some health issues, such as overgrown toenails and sores from skin infections, according to police. The dogs were also being treated for ear infections, dental problems and some behavioral issues due to a lack of human interaction.

“The underside of the cages were full of feces, urine, and old food,” Wolongevicz states in court documents. “A fan was running, however, it was not adequate ventilation and the room was extremely warm making the smell very potent.”

Most were mixes of popular small breeds and ranged in age from between six weeks and 13 years old. The puppies were being advertised for sale online for $500 each.

Wolongevicz notes in court documents that Robert and Nancy Enman hold a breeder’s license under “Puppies for ME.” However, the puppies she found for sale online were being sold through “Dogs R Us” by breeder “Bob and Nan” out of Auburn, with the same phone number as Robert and Nancy Enman.

The Enmans are scheduled to appear in West Bath District Court Sept. 4 for a seizure hearing, to determine if they should be able to get the animals back.

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