The Brick Store Museum’s contemporary exhibition space, the Bauman Family Gallery, welcomes multi-disciplinary artist Caleb Cole for an exhibit titled Remains. The exhibit features a mixture of artforms, including photography, found pieces, textile design and more. The show runs through Sept. 17.

The Brick Store Museum’s Bauman Family Gallery will host multi-disciplinary artist Caleb Cole for an exhibit titled Remains. The exhibit features a mixture of artforms and runs through Sept. 17. Brick Store Museum photo

“The exhibition brings together over a decade of Cole’s work that focuses on connection, community and memory, spanning themes as broad as group belonging, military service, violence against trans people and collective cultural losses from the AIDS epidemic,” said the museum in a news release. “Cole’s art centers that which is unknowable about the people and events of the past, not only to mourn and bear witness to those losses, but in an attempt to provide for who and what remains.”

Cole is a Midwest-born, Boston-based artist whose work addresses the opportunities and difficulties of belonging, as well as aims to be a link in the creation of that tradition, no matter how fragile or ephemeral or impossible its connections. They were recently an inaugural resident at Surf Point Residency in York; and have received an Artadia Boston Finalist Award; Hearst 8×10 Biennial Award; and 3 Magenta Flash Forward Foundation Fellowships, among other distinctions. Their work is in the permanent collections of the Museum of Fine Arts Boston, Newport Art Museum, the Davis Art Museum, Brown University Art Museum, and Leslie Lohman Museum of Art.

The Brick Store Museum’s Bauman Family Gallery will host multi-disciplinary artist Caleb Cole for an exhibit titled Remains. The exhibit features a mixture of artforms and runs through Sept. 17. Brick Store Museum photo

Cole teaches at Boston College and Clark University.

Visitors to the Brick Store Museum to view Cole’s exhibition will also see The Art of Mending, a show discussing the various meanings of mending and Who Makes History? an exhibition exploring the origins of the museum and two new archaeological projects in the region that help to expand the histories of the Wabanaki and a community of formerly enslaved people that once existed in Kennebunk from 1790 – 1830.

The museum is open Tuesday through Friday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Saturdays, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.; and Sundays, noon to 4 p.m. A special after-hours open house on Friday, Aug. 20, from 5 to 7 p.m. invites community members to visit the exhibitions for free after-hours.

filed under: