A thank you card by a student on display Thursday at Wells Elementary School. LIZ GOTTHELF/Journal Tribune

A thank you card by a student on display Thursday at Wells Elementary School. LIZ GOTTHELF/Journal Tribune

WELLS —  Students at Wells Elementary School learned Thursday about the importance of honoring the everyday heroes that sometimes go unnoticed.

That morning, the school held its annual Veterans Day assembly, and a handful of selected students addressed their fellow schoolmates and spoke about the significance of the day, held Nov. 11 on the anniversary of the end of World War I.

Fourth-grade student Derek Martin spoke about the importance of gratitude and the heroes that are all around us. Derek said that those who made sacrifices for their country are heroes, and their families are as well.

Students shake hands with veterans in the hallway of Wells Elementary School on Thursday as they leave an assembly. LIZ GOTTHELF/Journal Tribune

Students shake hands with veterans in the hallway of Wells Elementary School on Thursday as they leave an assembly. LIZ GOTTHELF/Journal Tribune

He said there were 1.7 million children in the country with a parent serving in the military and about 900,000 have had one or both parents deployed more than once. These children often worry something will happen to their parent who is deployed, miss them while they are away, and take on extra duties in the household.

A number of local veterans came to the assembly, and were given a round of applause and cards made by the students. A few spoke about their experiences.

Local parent and active military member Shane Maxon, answered questions from students, and spoke briefly about the uniform he was wearing. He said one of the most difficult aspects about being deployed was being away from his family.

Local Army Veteran Cynthia Davidson who served in Desert Shield and Desert Storm said those who serve are trying to make the world a better place. She said she and others who served appreciated services like those Thursday.

After serving, she said, those in the military take off their uniforms, change into plain clothes and go back to their home towns and everyday lives. “We’re still in the military, but sometimes being back in the community, we feel invisible,” she said.

The assembly also included a performance by the Wells High School Band and Color Guard, a flag folding ceremony by local boy scouts. Also in attendance were Patriot Riders of America-Maine Chapter 1.

— Staff Writer Liz Gotthelf can be contacted at 282-1535, ext. 325 or [email protected]


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