Marlins relief pitcher Brandon Kintzler celebrates after closing out a 2-0 victory over the Chicago Cubs in Game 2 of a first-round playoff series Friday in Chicago. The Marlins advance to face the Atlanta Braves in the NL Division Series. Nam Y. Huh/Associated Press

CHICAGO — The Miami Marlins didn’t need a hand from a fan at Wrigley Field to knock the Chicago Cubs out of the playoffs this time. They did just fine on their own, and they showed they’re hardly bottom feeders.

Garrett Cooper homered  against Yu Darvish in a two-run seventh, hard-throwing rookie Sixto Sánchez dominated for five innings and the Miami Marlins won their first playoff series in 17 years, beating the Cubs 2-0 Friday to complete a two-game wild card series sweep.

Miami will face Atlanta in the NL Division Series in Houston starting Tuesday.

Led by Manager Don Mattingly and CEO Derek Jeter, the Marlins remained unbeaten in all seven postseason series they have played following triumphs in the 1997 and 2003 World Series. And this time, in empty Wrigley Field, they didn’t need an assist from the crowd. In Game 6 of the 2003 NLCS, fan Steve Bartman deflected Luis Castillo’s foul ball as Cubs left fielder Moises Alou tried to make a leaping catch, which led to an eight-run, eighth-inning rally.

“The one thing that we talked about us all year was why not us?” Mattingly said. “With this kind of pitching, you can do anything. … You feel like you’ve got a good shot at kind of stopping almost anybody if you make pitches.”

Miami lost 105 games in 2019 and became the first team to reach the playoffs after a 100-loss season. The Marlins finished second in the NL East at 31-29 being beset by a virus outbreak early this season that forced 18 players from the field following the opening series and prevented them from playing for more than a week.

The Marlins had T-shirts with “Bottom Feeders” in their dugout Friday, a reference to a remark by Ricky Bottalico, a former Phillies pitcher and current NBC Sports Philadelphia analyst, after the Marlins’ Opening Day win in Philadelphia.

“I want to thank Ricky Bottalico for that motivation,” closer Brandon Kintzler said.

Chicago, the NL Central champion, went 3 for 27 (.111) with runners on base in the series. Javier Báez, Kris Bryant and Anthony Rizzo combined to go 0 for 12 Friday and finished the series 1 for 24. The trio is 19 for 142 (.134) with 52 strikeouts and six walks in the postseason since the 2016 World Series title as Chicago has lost nine of 13.

Chicago missed the playoffs last year for the first time since 2014, then scored one run in its return. The Cubs haven’t advanced since the 2017 team lost in the NLCS.

“Just numb,” Rizzo said,

Cooper gave the Marlins a 1-0 lead with two out in the seventh with a drive into the seats beyond the left-field wall. Matt Joyce doubled off the glove of diving center fielder Ian Happ, and Miguel Rojas chased Darvish with an RBI single.

“That’s probably the best feeling I’ve had in my baseball career, the biggest home run that I’ve had in my baseball career,” Cooper said. “It’s just something that you can’t explain.”

Sanchez overpowered the Cubs, striking out six and giving up four hits. The 22-year-old right-hander walked two and hit two batters.

Winner Brad Boxberger threw 1 1/3 innings. Richard Bleier got two outs in the seventh and Yimi García worked the eighth.

Kintzler, a former Cub, gave up a leadoff double to Jason Heyward in the ninth. But he struck out the next three batters, pumping his right arm after he got pinch hitter Jason Kipnis swinging on a 2-2 pitch to end the game.

PADRES 4, CARDINALS 0: Craig Stammen and eight fellow relievers combined on a four-hitter in a brilliant, record-setting effort that sent San Diego to the second round of the playoffs.

The Padres won a postseason series for the first time in 22 years and advanced to face the NL West rival Los Angeles Dodgers at Arlington, Texas, starting Tuesday.

The nine pitchers marked the most used in a nine-inning shutout in any big league game since 1901.

With starters Mike Clevinger and Dinelson Lamet unavailable because of injuries suffered in their final regular-season starts, rookie manager Jayce Tingler was forced to tap the Padres’ already-stressed bullpen, and it came through magnificently. San Diego became the first team in baseball history to use eight or more pitchers in three straight postseason games.

Trevor Rosenthal, who started his career with the Cardinals, struck out the side in the ninth and the Padres celebrated in empty Petco Park.

Fernando Tatis Jr., who homered twice and drove in five runs in Thursday night’s wild 11-9 victory, doubled into the left-field corner off losing pitcher Jack Flaherty with one out in the fifth and scored on Eric Hosmer’s two-out double to right-center.

The Padres added on against reliever Alex Reyes in the seventh, on a bases-loaded walk to Hosmer and Manny Machado’s fielder’s choice and an error on third baseman Tommy Edman.

Rookie Jake Cronenworth homered in the eighth.

NOTES

TIGERS: General Manager Al Avila said Detroit is not ruling out the possibility of hiring A.J. Hinch or Alex Cora for its manager vacancy.

Hinch and Cora were suspended through the 2020 postseason for their roles in the Houston Astros’ sign-stealing scandal. The Astros fired Hinch and general manager Jeff Luhnow on Jan. 13 and Cora lost his job managing the Boston Red Sox the following day. Cora spent the 2017 season as bench coach on Hinch’s staff with Houston.

The Tigers are in the market for a replacement for Ron Gardenhire, who retired on Sept. 19 with a little more than a week left in the season. Avila was asked about Hinch and Cora, and while Detroit’s search appears to be in a very early stage, the GM at least seemed open to the possibility of hiring one of the suspended managers.

“Really, I can’t say that I’ve eliminated anybody,” Avila said. “The cheating scandal is not a good thing, obviously. They’re serving their suspensions, and once their suspensions are over, then they’ll be free to pursue their careers. So we have not eliminated anybody from our list at this point.”

Avila said interviews will be conducted by video, but he could meet face to face once the list of candidates is down to a small number.

“We could finish this sometime in October. It might go into November,” he said. “Really, we’re not in a rush. We’re kind of taking our time with it.”

MVP AWARD: The name of the former baseball commissioner who never allowed Black players in the majors during his long reign is being pulled off future MVP plaques after more than 75 years.

Kenesaw Mountain Landis won’t be depicted on the annual awards presented by the Baseball Writers’ Association of the America, the group said Friday. The decision came after 89% of its membership voted this week for removal.

“SWEET” LOU JOHNSON, who hit a key home run for the victorious Los Angeles Dodgers in Game 7 of the 1965 World Series and scored the only run in Sandy Koufax’s perfect game the same year, has died. He was 86.

Johnson died Wednesday night at his home in Los Angeles, according to the Dodgers, who were informed by his wife. He had been in ill health and died a day after his birthday.

Johnson played 17 seasons in professional baseball, including eight years in the majors with the Chicago Cubs (1960, ’68), California Angels (1961, ’69), Milwaukee Braves (1962), Dodgers (1965-67) and Cleveland Indians (1968). He hit .258 with 48 homers and 232 RBI in 677 games.

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