CAPE ELIZABETH

Crews rescue man who fell onto rocks at Fort Williams

Emergency workers rescued a man who they say fell onto rocks along the shoreline at Fort Williams Park on Tuesday.

The man was rescued around 5 p.m., after Cape Elizabeth emergency crews responded to a report of someone falling near Portland Head Light.

Fire and Rescue Chief Peter Gleeson said the man, believed to be in his 20s, was climbing on the rocks when he fell about 20 feet. He landed in a difficult place for crews to reach — about 100 feet below the cliff’s edge.

The town’s Water Extrication Team and firefighters used ladders to slide a stretcher down the cliff to the victim. The man, whose name was unavailable, was taken to a hospital.

Gleeson could not provide additional details about the man’s condition or why he was climbing on the rocks.

PORTLAND

Damage to lines knocks out FairPoint Internet service

Thousands of FairPoint Communications customers lost their Internet service for several hours Tuesday after Central Maine Power Co. equipment overheated and damaged FairPoint’s high-speed data lines, officials said.

FairPoint customer service representatives got more than 100 calls indicating scattered Internet outages — but no phone service interruptions — across much of Maine, said spokesman Jeff Nevins.

The problem was caused by a fire involving a utility pole outside FairPoint’s state headquarters in Portland, Nevins said. Service was restored by early afternoon.

The outage happened after CMP equipment overheated and melted before falling off a utility pole and onto FairPoint’s fiber-optic cables, said CMP spokesman John Carroll.

FairPoint didn’t have a precise number of customers who lost Internet service. The company has tens of thousands of Internet access lines in Maine, but it does not release exact figures on a state-by-state basis, Nevins said.

School multicultural services head gets Rotary recognition

Grace Valenzuela, director of multicultural services in Portland’s public schools, has been named a Paul Harris Fellow by the Portland Rotary Club for her work to improve educational opportunities for immigrants.

The award is named after a Chicago lawyer who started the international club with three business associates in 1905.

Rotarians bestow the fellowships on people who show that they share the Rotary Foundation’s mission to advance world understanding, good will and peace through the improvement of health and education and alleviation of poverty.

 

Berwick student’s artwork to be shown at U.S. Capitol

The artwork of Noble High School student Amanda Morin of Berwick has been chosen to hang at the U.S. Capitol.

As a winner in the 2010 Congressional High School Art Competition, Morin’s digital photograph will represent Maine’s 1st District in an exhibition that features artwork from every congressional district in the country. Sage Lewis, curator at the Portland Museum of Art, and Michelle Lewis, chair of art education at the Maine College of Art, judged the competition.

“This photograph demonstrates an intimate multi-layered look at a sleeping figure,” the two judges said of Morin’s winning piece, an untitled photograph that overlays several components.

Nearly 50 submissions were sent in from across the district. Second place was awarded to Madeline Bunker of Wells High School for her pencil drawing “Circles,” and third place went to David Brann of Mount Ararat High School in Topsham for his photograph “Watching the World Go By.”

AUBURN

Inmate who hanged himself identified as Lewiston man

The man who hanged himself in the Androscoggin County Jail has been identified as George Magee, 53, of Lewiston.

The Sun Journal reported that Magee was being held for a probation violation.

Investigators from the Maine Department of Corrections were at the jail Monday, trying to determine the circumstances surrounding Magee’s death.

Correctional officers found Magee on Saturday. He had hanged himself with a bedsheet.

LIMESTONE

Army National Guard chief to tour military overhaul site

The acting director of the Army National Guard and other officials will visit a Maine company that overhauls Humvees and other military equipment.

On Friday, a delegation led by Maj. Gen. Raymond Carpenter will tour the Maine Military Authority at the request of Sen. Susan Collins, R-Maine, a member of the Armed Services Committee.

Collins wants to ensure that there’s adequate work for the Limestone-based company. She said that the Maine Military Authority consistently does the work at a lower cost than the Army’s own depots, saving money for taxpayers. It now employs 370 workers.

STONINGTON

Lobster hatchery suspends operations after five years

A lobster hatchery in eastern Maine is suspending operations after five years of raising tiny lobsters.

The Penobscot East Resource Center in Stonington has released hundreds of thousands of juvenile lobsters over the years to boost the lobster population.

The nonprofit told the Bangor Daily News that it has decided to use the limited funding that was spent on the hatchery and apply it to other projects.

Associate Director Veronica Young said the center will focus more of its funds on research into groundfish, such as haddock, cod and flounder, which are in short supply in Maine waters.

AUGUSTA

State gets $173,250 to create salmon conservation plan

The state has received a $173,250 grant to protect Atlantic salmon.

The money will allow the Department of Marine Resources to start a statewide conservation plan.

U.S. Sens. Olympia Snowe and Susan Collins, both R-Maine, said that with the grant funding, the state will be able to work with landowners, conservation organizations and other partners to protect the threatened species.

The grant from the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service’s Cooperative Endangered Species Conservation Fund will cover one year of planning to develop a conservation plan for Atlantic salmon and other fish.