FARMINGTON — Students at Mt. Blue High School were sent home early Tuesday because of a bomb threat, which was made one week after a similar threat disrupted classes.

A written threat was found at the high school, according to Leanne Condon, a district administrator. Students there and at two other schools in Mt. Blue Regional School District 9 were dismissed at 11:30 a.m.

Although they faced no threat, Mt. Blue Middle School and Foster Technology Center had to be dismissed to accommodate bus schedules so the district’s four elementary schools could be released on time, she said.

The three schools dismissed early, with more than 1,000 students combined, are expected to resume classes Monday after the Thanksgiving break, Condon said.

Police and school officials are investigating both threats and have not found any links or identified the people behind them, she said.

Friday, students at the high school were bused to alternate sites because a threat was made for that day. Police searched the high school for bombs and cleared the building to resume classes Monday, Condon said.

The threats have disrupted classes and may add days to the end of the school year, something that is worrisome since there are already limited snow days left for winter, Condon said.

The more than 2,300 students in the district already face an extended school year. Construction delays tied to a $60 million renovation project at the high school campus pushed back the first day of classes this year, adding an extra three days to the end of the school year.

“Students and staff are really getting frustrated by the threats,” Condon said.

Parents also kept a significant number of the 737 students at the high school home on Friday because of the bomb threat, Condon said, though she uncertain of the number of excused absences.

After the delayed start, the last day of school had been scheduled for June 13, which is subject to change depending on the number of snow days and other cancellations.

Condon said Tuesday that it’s unclear how many more classes can be canceled before adding more days, which may create problems for graduation and other end-of-year events.

Previous threats made over the years against school buildings in the district have not required the same reaction. Each case is taken seriously, investigated and the appropriate safety precautions are taken, Condon said.

“We’re still investigating (the threats) and we really need to get back to educating students,” she said.

Making a bomb threat is a felony that can be punished by up to five years in prison along with fines, according to Shane Cote, deputy chief for the Farmington Police Department.

Cote said Tuesday that people who make the threat are typically charged with terrorizing. The penalties may vary depending on the circumstances and person committing the crime, he said, though he was uncertain about details minors would face.

David Robinson — 861-9287

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