Spring fishing doesn’t get any better than right now. And reports pouring in from state biologists in the seven regions across Maine echo the same message: Fast action.

SOUTHERN MAINE

While smelt runs are slowing down in most places, the trout and salmon fishing is picking up everywhere, including the southern region.

Thompson Lake is the hot spot at the moment, but fishing on Sebago is still good.

Regional biologist Francis Brautigam reports that lake trout and salmon reports coming out of Sebago have been “exceptional.” Biologists hope to learn more there in the coming weeks.

The creel survey that takes place every two years has begun, and anglers on Sebago will find biologists asking about their catch rate on a weekly basis. State biologists will be out each week surveying anglers on a weekday and on the weekend.

The data provides another look into the condition of the fish and the abundance of lake trout in Sebago, which can be a problem as biologists try to grow the native, landlocked salmon there.

CENTRAL MAINE

The recent rain displaced the fish stocked after ice-out, mixing the hatchery fish in the cold water, said biologist Bobby Van Riper. And that can make for good fishing.

To find out where the fish are stocked in this region and around the state, go to: http://1.usa.gov/gnFf0y.

DOWN EAST

Just like elsewhere in the state, salmon fishing is hot right now along the Down East coast, in particular the water bodies north of Route 9, said regional biologist Greg Burr.

The head biologist recommends trolling for salmon on smaller ponds in this area, or on West Grand Lake.

Anglers also are reporting nice brook trout caught in smaller trout ponds, as well as brooks and streams.

Burr doesn’t like to direct too much fishing pressure to these waters; however, he offered a nice list of lakes where largemouth bass fishing should be picking up soon.

Those lakes are: Pocomoonshine Lake in Alexander; Toddy Pond and Alamoosook Lake in Orland; Crawford Lake in Crawford; and Hadley Lake in East Machias.

WESTERN MAINE

Around Rangeley Lake, the fishing reports are a mixed bag. The brook trout caught reportedly have been really fat, “nearly football shape,” said biologist Jason Seiders, but he also said it’s been quiet.

Seiders expects locals are taking advantage of the smelt runs, which are in full swing in the region. Remote places like Aziscohos Lake in Lincoln Plantation are popular spots during the runs, he said.

MOOSEHEAD REGION

Moosehead Lake opened for business on May 1, and biologists expect good reports rolling in now that it’s open for the season. Regional biologist Tim Obrey said the salmon and lake trout caught through the ice last winter were in great shape, and he expects more of the same this spring.

Meanwhile, the smelt runs are slowing down, but the fishing is still fast at the surface.

The mouth of the Moose River is always a popular spot in the early spring, Obrey noted.

EASTERN MAINE

The fishing should heat up after the rain that fell in eastern Maine, and the East Branch of the Penobscot River is one area where that’s been the case, said biologist Nels Kramer.

“With the rain and this cold, the rivers are matching spring levels. It’s a good thing,” Kramer said.

Also, salmon fishing is getting fast in East Grand, Kramer reported.

NORTHERN MAINE

Fishing in The County is following the rest of Maine and getting fast, according to regional biologist Frank Frost.

The rain brought up water levels and hatches are happening in the afternoon, making this week potentially the best of spring.

“On sunny days when the temperature rises 5 to 6 degrees, in the afternoon there’s pretty decent fishing,” Frost said.

All stocked trout ponds along the New Brunswick border from Houlton to Calais will offer fast fishing right now, Frost said. Most of those ponds have good public access — so have at it.

Staff Writer Deirdre Fleming can be contacted at 791-6452 or at: [email protected]

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