December 1, 2013

Tips for the cleaning and care of china, glassware and silver

It’s holiday party season – are you ready?

By Mary Beth Breckenridge
McClatchy Newspapers

Company’s coming. Is your dinnerware ready?

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Experts recommend hand-washing china, even if it’s considered dishwasher-safe.

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Water is corrosive to silver – don’t let it soak too long.

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Additional Photos Below

With the advent of the holiday party season, now is a good time to take stock of your fine dinnerware and make sure it’s looking its best for the entertaining opportunities ahead.

China, crystal and silver deserve careful handling, so we turned to the experts at Replacements Ltd. for advice on cleaning and caring for them. The North Carolina company is known for selling individual pieces to replace missing or damaged dinnerware, and it also restores and repairs precious pieces.

Here’s what its experts advised.

CHINA

Scratches, heat and harsh detergents can damage fine china, especially antique pieces. That’s why Sara Vestal, the company’s lead supervisor of china and crystal restoration, recommends always hand washing china, regardless of whether it’s considered dishwasher safe.

Line the bottom of your sink with a dish towel or rubber mat for cushioning, and use a mild dishwashing liquid. Avoid anything with lemon, orange or any other type of acid, as well as dishwashing liquid that contains chlorine bleach. Acids wear the finish, and chlorine leaves behind a residue that breaks down china at a molecular level, Vestal said.

“You might not see the damage that day. You might not see it for a while,” she said. But eventually – and unfortunately – you will.

Wash china in water that’s tepid or warm. Vestal said water that’s too hot or cold can cause small cracks.

If you still insist on using a dishwasher to clean dishwasher-safe china, use the gentle cycle and turn off the heated drying cycle, she said. Use a mild detergent (no lemon-scented products), and load the dishwasher carefully so the pieces won’t touch during the wash cycle. Let the china cool to room temperature before removing it to avoid damaging metallic trim, which is more fragile when it’s heated.

Store china in an area that has the same temperature and humidity conditions as the living areas of your home, not in an attic or basement. Extreme changes in heat and humidity can cause crazing, or fine cracks in the glaze.

If you stack pieces, add cushioning in between. You can buy china cushions, or use pieces of flannel, coffee filters or napkins. Be careful not to slide pieces on top of one another.

Avoid stacking pieces that have handles. Hang cups on a rack, or stack them no more than two high. Stacking cups weakens the rim, causing cracking or chipping.

SILVERWARE

Most of us store away our silver and silver-plated flatware for most of the year and take it out only for the most special of occasions.

Rory Richmond has a different idea.

Use your silver, said Richmond, who manages silver fulfillment operations at Replacements Ltd. Silver develops a patina with handling and use, which improves its appearance and gives it character, he said. That patina actually comes from tiny scratches in the surface that create a soft finish.

In addition, exposure to air causes oxidation, which produces a desirable darkening in the little crevices of the pattern. That darkening makes the design stand out more, Richmond said.

When you do use your silver, wash it immediately after use, and wash it well, he said. It’s particularly important to remove salt and citrus, which can damage silverware – especially silver plate, because it has just a thin layer of silver over a metal base. Mayonnaise, vinegar and eggs can also be problematic.

Don’t let silver soak in water for a long time, he cautioned. The water is corrosive and can also loosen the glue used to attach handles.

He recommended hand washing, because the heat of a dishwasher can damage the silver over time and loosen glue. And as with china, avoid detergents with citrus. The invisible residue they leave can cause rust, he said.

(Continued on page 2)

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Additional Photos

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Wash china in tepid water. Very hot water can cause tiny cracks.

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Glassware can become cloudy without proper care.

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