November 11, 2012

Dine Out Maine: Edna and Lucy's serves lunch like Grandma used to make

Five miles from Freeport, this excellent cafe is worth a drive.

By NANCY HEISER

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Edna and Lucy’s is well worth the drive to Pownal for its wonderful soups, sandwiches and baked goods. And do try the doughnuts.

Telegram file

DINING REVIEW

EDNA AND LUCY'S

407 Hallowell Road, Pownal

688-3029; tinyurl.com/ednaandlucy

★★★★

HOURS: 7 a.m. to 3 p.m. Wednesday to Friday; 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday and Sunday

CREDIT CARDS: Mastercard, Visa, Discover

PRICE RANGE: $2.75 to $7.25

VEGETARIAN: Yes, including vegan.

GLUTEN-FREE: Yes, they can put sandwich fillings on greens.

KIDS: Welcome

RESERVATIONS: No

BAR: No

WHEELCHAIR ACCESS: Yes, side entrance has a ramp.

BOTTOM LINE: Set on a country road five miles from Freeport, this cafe is a find. Soups, sandwiches and baked goods are tasty, original, fairly priced and served in a warm and homey atmosphere, drawing customers of all ages and stripes. Don't miss the homemade doughnuts.

Ratings follow this scale and take into consideration food, atmosphere, service and value: ★ Poor, ★★ Fair, ★★★ Good, ★★★★ Excellent, ★★★★★ Extraordinary.

The Maine Sunday Telegram visits an establishment twice if the first dining experience was unsatisfactory. The reviewer dines anonymously.

A side of french fries ($2.75) – hot, crispy and served in a paper bag – was so good that the 5-year-old in our group said, "You don't even need ketchup." Somehow, the crust of the potato sections had elements of both crispiness and fluff.

I asked for the secret, and Sabrina Warner, the other co-owner, obliged: "Only two things go in our fry oil, doughnuts and french fries. We like to say that the french fry oil makes the doughnuts so good and the doughnut oil makes the fries so good."

Do not miss the homemade baked items. While there's not a lot to choose from on any given day, what's offered is usually scrumptious (judging by our two-item sampling, at any rate). A simple cinnamon sugar donut (75 cents) featured a deep gold and crusty exterior covered with the grainy sweetness over a soft and crumbly center – a three-textured delight that bore no resemblance to one found at a chain. The cranberry walnut scone was a delicious triangle with chunks of fruit and nut and a touch of cinnamon ($1.75).

In the world of eat-in or take-out $7 sandwiches and salads and $4 soups, this place stands out for uncommonly prepared comestibles and atmosphere. Make the field trip.

Nancy Heiser is a freelance writer and editor. She can be reached at:

nancyheiser.com

 

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