November 25, 2012

A little cottage can fill a big need in the backyard

By CEDAR BURNETT The Associated Press

Something small is afoot. Backyard cottages -- from 800-square-foot bungalows to Lilliputian studio cabins -- are springing up behind houses in many cities, some of which have changed zoning laws to accommodate them.

click image to enlarge

A prefabricated cabin is used as a backyard artist studio in Pasadena, Calif. The Zip model by Cabin Fever in Miami, Fla., comes flat-packed and can be assembled in just a few days.

The Associated Press

Often, the cottages are built for aging parents or grown children. Sometimes, they're rented out for extra income, or are used as studios or offices.

"Backyard cottages increase density in a nice way," says Bruce Parker, principal of the Seattle-based design collective Microhouse. "They use existing infrastructure and ... they're inherently sustainable. A cottage is the antithesis of a big house on a tiny lot."

Seattle updated its zoning laws in 2009 to allow for "accessory dwelling units" on single-family lots of at least 4,000 square feet. (Permits are needed depending on the size of the cottage and whether it has plumbing and electricity.)

While Parker had been designing small homes for several years, the microhouse law inspired him to focus on backyard dwellings. Soon, he was teaching classes on backyard cottages with the Seattle firm NCompass Construction.

About 90 percent of his students, he said, wanted to build a cottage for their parents.

"Rather than paying thousands of dollars a month for assisted living, you can have your parents with you and they can help with the kids -- but everyone gets their own space," says Parker.

Often, it's the parents who pay to build the cottages. "It's an investment for their comfort and a way to improve their children's property," says Parker. "One pragmatic woman told me she hoped her great-granddaughter would use it for college housing after she was gone."

In Portland, Ore., which changed zoning rules in 2010 to allow for backyard cottages, Jasmine Deatherage and her mother, Diane Hoglund, looked for a house with a large yard specifically with this living arrangement in mind.

"We really wanted to live together," says Deatherage. "I have a 2-year-old and my mom will be taking on some of the childcare. It's a special time to live together."

Before her mother bought the house, they asked the previous owner to build a basic single-car garage, which they plan to convert into a fully functioning mother-in-law cottage by next summer.

While not every young family would opt to have their parents so close, Deatherage notes that it's common historically and globally. "My husband is from Mexico where it's very normal to live with your family," she says. "His whole family lives together and if we lived there we'd live with them too."

For other homeowners, backyard cottages are an opportunity for small-scale entrepreneurship.

Bob DiPalma of Burlington, Vt., didn't set out to run a mini-hotel out of his yard but the project "crept up on me." While rehabilitating their 100-year-old barn, he and his wife saw the opportunity to convert the space into an apartment above a garage. They drew up designs, hired a contractor and soon had a fully-functioning vacation rental.

"Over the last four years, we've had really wonderful guests who have appreciated the space," DiPalma says.

Sometimes, the need for more space is just a need for ... more space.

"So many people are working from home," says Gayle Zalduondo, principal of the Miami-based Cabin Fever, which sells prefab cabins. "Rather than going offsite, they're adding a cabin. People need more space, but they're not comfortable upsizing to a larger house, especially in this economy."

Some of her customers want a guest house, while others are artists, musicians and independent service providers -- from freelance graphic designers to massage therapists.

Unlike the fully outfitted miniature homes being used for rental properties and mother-in-law quarters, small backyard cabins without kitchens and bathrooms do not require permits in many states.

(Continued on page 2)

Were you interviewed for this story? If so, please fill out our accuracy form

Send question/comment to the editors




Further Discussion

Here at PressHerald.com we value our readers and are committed to growing our community by encouraging you to add to the discussion. To ensure conscientious dialogue we have implemented a strict no-bullying policy. To participate, you must follow our Terms of Use.

Questions about the article? Add them below and we’ll try to answer them or do a follow-up post as soon as we can. Technical problems? Email them to us with an exact description of the problem. Make sure to include:
  • Type of computer or mobile device your are using
  • Exact operating system and browser you are viewing the site on (TIP: You can easily determine your operating system here.)