February 19

Local & State Dispatches

Man who crashed snowmobile is charged with OUI; Poet Richard Blanco to start writing program at Gould, and more news from around the state.

From staff and news services

MADISON

click image to enlarge

Sen. Susan Collins, a Republican from Maine, visits Bath Iron Works on Tuesday on a visit to speak with BIW President Frederick Harris and union representatives.

John Patriquin/Staff Photographer

Man charged with OUI for crashing his snowmobile

A Madison man who in December crashed his snowmobile into a parked car on a residential street has been charged with operating after suspension and criminal operating under the influence.

Jeffrey Hayden, 30, is scheduled to appear on March 5 in Skowhegan District Court, according to Sgt. David Trask of the Madison Police Department.

Hayden crashed the snowmobile during a snowstorm Dec. 29 into a parked car on John Street. The car was totaled in the crash, Trask said. No one was injured.

A blood-alcohol test showed that Hayden had a blood-alcohol concentration of 0.21 percent, more than twice the legal limit, Trask said.

Hayden is a military veteran and has been diagnosed with post-traumatic stress disorder, according to Trask, and he is enrolling in a rehabilitation program at VA Maine Healthcare Systems-Togus.

BETHEL

Blanco starting writers program at Gould Academy

Inaugural poet Richard Blanco is helping Gould Academy show that there’s more to the prep school than ski programs.

The Bethel resident this week will announce a visiting writers program in his name. Over a two-week retreat, writers will stay in a private cottage owned by Blanco where they can work on their craft. They’ll also engage with students and faculty through classroom visits and workshops.

The announcement is set for Thursday at the college prep school that’s known for its ski programs.

Blanco drew wide praise for his poem “One Today,” which paid homage to the American experience during President Barack Obama’s second inauguration.

SKOWHEGAN

Police: Man charged with robbing banks with hammer bought drugs

A Bingham man charged with robbing two banks while armed with a carpenter’s hammer used all the money taken in the robberies – more than $8,000 – to buy drugs, according to the district attorney.

Travis A. Carrigan allegedly made off with more than $5,000 in cash Jan. 17 from Camden National Bank and $3,600 in cash Feb. 4 at Skowhegan Savings Bank, both on Main Street in Bingham, according to newly filed court documents.

“Unfortunately, none of the money was recovered,” District Attorney Maeghan Maloney said Tuesday.

Carrigan, 35, of Murray Street and who also is listed on court paperwork as living on Garfield Street in Madison, was arraigned Friday in Skowhegan District Court. He did not enter a plea to the charges. Bail was set at $250,000 cash.

Carrigan will be in jail for at least the next month. He was out on personal recognizance bail on a license suspension charge to which he had pleaded not guilty, and the judge is entertaining the district attorney’s motion that bail be revoked because of the robbery charges. A hearing on that, as well as a hearing on the robbery charges, is scheduled for March 26.

BANGOR

Man gets 10 months in prison for selling oxycodone

An Augusta man will spend 10 months in federal prison for his involvement in selling 37 oxycodone pills on May 9, 2012, a day after he allegedly stole them in a robbery at a CVS Pharmacy in Augusta.

Michael C. Pierce, 33, pleaded guilty last October in federal court to illegal distribution of oxycodone.

He was sentenced Tuesday by Chief Judge John A. Woodcock Jr. in U.S. District Court in Bangor.

Were you interviewed for this story? If so, please fill out our accuracy form

Send question/comment to the editors




Further Discussion

Here at PressHerald.com we value our readers and are committed to growing our community by encouraging you to add to the discussion. To ensure conscientious dialogue we have implemented a strict no-bullying policy. To participate, you must follow our Terms of Use.

Questions about the article? Add them below and we’ll try to answer them or do a follow-up post as soon as we can. Technical problems? Email them to us with an exact description of the problem. Make sure to include:
  • Type of computer or mobile device your are using
  • Exact operating system and browser you are viewing the site on (TIP: You can easily determine your operating system here.)