September 28, 2013

With four days until shutdown, House Republicans on clock

They must decide if they will insist on defunding Obamacare, even if it means shutting down the government and America defaulting on its payments.

BY PAUL KANE, ED O'KEEFE AND LORI MONTGOMERY The Washington Post

WASHINGTON — 
With Washington barreling toward a government shutdown, a deadlocked Congress entered the final weekend of the fiscal year with no clear ideas of how to avoid furloughs for more than 800,000 federal workers. Millions more could be left without paychecks.

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Speaker of the House John Boehner, R-Ohio, walks to the floor of the House as Congress continues to struggle over how to fund the government and prevent a possible shutdown, at the Capitol in Washington, Friday, Sept. 27, 2013.

AP Photo / J. Scott Applewhite

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President Barack Obama leaves the podium after making a statement regarding the budget fight in Congress and foreign policy challenges on Friday at the White House in Washington.

The Associated Press

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The Senate on Friday approved a stopgap government funding bill and promptly departed, leaving all of the pressure to find a solution on House Republican leaders.

President Obama weighed in, sternly lecturing GOP leaders that the easiest path forward was to approve the Senate's bill, which includes money for the implementation of the Affordable Care Act, the president's prized legislation achievement, which he signed into law in 2010. But a far-right bloc of House and Senate Republicans banded together to leave House Speaker John Boehner, R-Ohio, virtually powerless to act.

"My message to Congress is this: Do not shut down the government. Do not shut down the economy. Pass a budget on time," Obama said in the White House press briefing room.

Boehner's leadership team offered no public comment and remained out of sight most of Friday, hunkering down for another weekend on the brink. For Boehner, this is the latest in a series of unstable moments that have become the hallmark of his three-year run as speaker.

With a stroke-of-midnight deadline on Monday, Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev., said Democrats would reject any conservative add-ons that Boehner might attach to the funding bill. That would further delay passage, and given the staunch opposition from Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, who has said that he will make no concession to help move the process along, the slow-moving Senate would require up to a week to approve something even if Reid were amenable to the changes. That sets the stage for a shutdown Tuesday.

"We've passed the only bill that can avert a government shutdown Monday night. I said this on the floor, I say it again: This is it, time is gone," Reid said Friday after the midday passage of the funding bill on a party-line vote.

Before that final roll call, Cruz's attempt to filibuster the legislation was throttled in a bipartisan 79-to-19 vote, but the first-year senator drew support from nearly half the rank-and-file Republicans in defiance of Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky.

Cruz confirmed reports that he has been huddling with House conservatives to help plot their strategy to force Boehner's hand on the health-care law. "I am confident if the House listens to the people, as it did last week, that it will continue to step forward and respond to the suffering that is coming from Obamacare," Cruz told reporters Friday, saying he has had "numerous conversations" with House Republicans.

While the health-care law has had some provisions delayed amid a wobbly rollout, Obama and Democrats oppose any effort to strip funding or delay implementation of the law as it begins a critical new period next week. The president warned that demands to delay the Affordable Care Act's implementation were even more reckless in connection with raising the debt limit, because the Treasury will run out of maneuvers to continue borrowing Oct. 17 and will head toward a first-of-its-kind default on the nearly $17 trillion debt. Economists have warned that a default would send a shock through global financial markets and would jolt interest rates.

(Continued on page 2)

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House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi of California gestures while speaking during a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington on Friday as Congress continues to struggle over how to fund the government and prevent a possible shutdown.

The Associated Press

  


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