November 14, 2012

Money woes for Fla. family at center of general's scandal

The Associated Press

TAMPA, Fla. — When news vans camped outside her stately home, a Florida socialite tied to the Gen. David Petraeus sex scandal fell back on her informal credentials as a social ambassador for Tampa society and top military brass: She asked police for diplomatic protection.

click image to enlarge

Jill Kelley leaves her home Tuesday, Nov 13, 2012 in Tampa, Fla. Kelley is identified as the woman who allegedly received harassing emails from Gen. David Petraeus' paramour, Paula Broadwell. She serves as an unpaid social liaison to MacDill Air Force Base in Tampa, where the military's Central Command and Special Operations Command are located. (AP Photo/Chris O'Meara)

AP

click image to enlarge

This July 13, 2011, photo made available on the International Security Assistance Force's Flickr website shows the former Commander of International Security Assistance Force and U.S. Forces-Afghanistan Gen. Davis Petraeus, left, shaking hands with Paula Broadwell, co-author of "All In: The Education of General David Petraeus." The two allegedly had an extramarital affair. (AP Photo/ISAF)

Related headlines

In a phone call to authorities, Jill Kelley, a party hostess and unofficial social liaison for leaders of the U.S. military's Central Command in Tampa, cited her status as an honorary consul general while complaining about news media that had descended on her two-story, five-bedroom brick home overlooking Tampa Bay, which was purchased in 2004 for $1.5 million.

"You know, I don't know if by any chance, because I'm an honorary consul general, so I have inviolability, so they should not be able to cross my property. I don't know if you want to get diplomatic protection involved as well," she told the 911 dispatcher Monday.

Nearly all lines in the tangled sex scandal involving Petraeus lead back to Kelley, whose complaint about anonymous, threatening emails triggered the FBI investigation that led to the general's downfall as director of the CIA. And now Kelley is in the middle of an investigation of Gen. John Allen, the top U.S. commander in Afghanistan, over alleged "inappropriate communications" between the two.

New details emerged Wednesday about how the investigation got started. Out of concern, Kelley reached out to an FBI agent in June she met about a year ago when she attended the bureau's Citizens' Academy in Tampa, according to a person close to Jill Kelley who spoke on condition of anonymity because of the ongoing investigation.

The FBI program shows members of the public at least some of what the FBI does and how it works. Kelley was not asking the agent, whom she had kept in touch with since the academy, to conduct an investigation into the emails, the person said.

But the FBI agent said the emails raised serious concerns because the anonymous author knew the comings and goings of two of the nation's most senior generals, including the CIA director.

Around the end of July or beginning of August, the agent told Kelley he had been taken off the case and he was concerned the FBI was not aggressively pursuing it, the person said.

In August, a second FBI agent contacted Kelley to make sure he had all the relevant materials, the person said. That agent told Kelley that Paula Broadwell was the author of the emails. Kelley did not know who Broadwell was — Petraeus never told Kelley about his affair with the biographer, the person said.

Kelley's friendship with Petraeus and his wife began when the general arrived in Tampa about 2008. Kelley and her husband, Scott, a cancer surgeon, had moved to the area a few years earlier and threw a welcome party at their home, a short distance from MacDill Air Force Base, where Central Command is headquartered.

Hundreds of pages of court documents in several lawsuits detail financial troubles for the Kelleys and Jill Kelley's twin sister, Natalie Khawam, who lived with the couple.

Chase Bank sued Scott Kelley in 2010 over a $25,880 unpaid credit card bill, and an investment by the Kelleys in a Tampa office building turned into a dispute with the tenant over $28,000-a-month rent. The couple didn't pay the mortgage and entered into foreclosure.

(Continued on page 2)

Were you interviewed for this story? If so, please fill out our accuracy form

Send question/comment to the editors




Further Discussion

Here at PressHerald.com we value our readers and are committed to growing our community by encouraging you to add to the discussion. To ensure conscientious dialogue we have implemented a strict no-bullying policy. To participate, you must follow our Terms of Use.

Questions about the article? Add them below and we’ll try to answer them or do a follow-up post as soon as we can. Technical problems? Email them to us with an exact description of the problem. Make sure to include:
  • Type of computer or mobile device your are using
  • Exact operating system and browser you are viewing the site on (TIP: You can easily determine your operating system here.)