October 21, 2013

Jim Leyland steps down as Detroit Tigers manager

Leyland, 68, retires after eight seasons with Detroit, including two trips to the World Series.

By Noah Trister
The Associated Press

DETROIT – A picture of Jim Leyland’s face stared out from the video board at an empty Comerica Park, next to that familiar Olde English “D’’ and a message that said simply: “Thank You Jim.”

click image to enlarge

Detroit Tigers manager Jim Leyland, right, announces he is stepping down as manager as general manager David Dombrowski, left, listens during a news conference at Comerica Park in Detroit, Monday, Oct. 21, 2013. Leyland is stepping down after eight seasons that included three division titles and two trips to the World Series.

AP Photo/Paul Sancya

click image to enlarge

Detroit Tigers baseball manager Jim Leyland announces he is stepping down as manager during a news conference at Comerica Park in Detroit, Monday, Oct. 21, 2013.

The Associated Press

After eight seasons managing the Tigers, including three division titles and two American League pennants, Leyland stepped down Monday. His voice cracking at times, wiping away tears at others, he announced his departure two days after Detroit was eliminated by Boston in the AL championship series.

“It’s been a thrill,” the 68-year-old Leyland said during a news conference at the ballpark. “I came here to change talent to team, and I think with the help of this entire organization, I think we’ve done that. We’ve won quite a bit. I’m very grateful to have been a small part of that.”

Leyland made his managerial debut with the Pittsburgh Pirates in 1986, and from Barry Bonds to Miguel Cabrera, he’s managed some of the sport’s biggest stars and been involved in some of baseball’s most memorable games over the past quarter-century.

In 1992, his Pirates lost Game 7 of the NLCS when Atlanta rallied in the bottom of the ninth inning. Five years later, Leyland won his only World Series title as manager when his Florida Marlins beat Cleveland in an 11-inning thriller in Game 7.

He’s experienced some of the highest highs the game has to offer, but he also endured difficult rebuilding periods in both Pittsburgh and Florida.

After one season with the Colorado Rockies, Leyland didn’t manage at all from 2000-05 before Detroit hired him. Leyland led the Tigers to the World Series immediately after taking over in 2006, losing to St. Louis in five games. The Tigers went to the World Series again in 2012 but were swept by San Francisco.

Leyland worked under one-year contracts the last couple years, saying he was content to wait until after the season to address his status. He was reflective late this season, mentioning to reporters that he had already managed the Tigers longer than he had expected they would keep him, but he also said in September that he still loved the atmosphere, the competition and his team.

In fact, he’d actually told general manager Dave Dombrowski in early September that he didn’t want to return as manager. He expects to remain with the organization in some capacity after going 700-597 as a manager.

“I’m not totally retiring today, I’m just not going to be in the dugout anymore,” Leyland said. “I hope and pray that you give the next manager the same respect and the same chance that you gave me.”

Leyland says his health is fine, but it’s time to stop managing. He said he started weighing his decision around June.

“I started thinking this was getting a little rough. I thought that the fuel was getting a little low,” Leyland said. “I knew that I’d get through it because I knew we’d be playing for something.”

Detroit’s players found out about Leyland’s departure after Saturday night’s game in Boston, when the Red Sox won Game 6 to take the series.

“You’ve got your head down, you lost and the season’s over, and then Jim dropped that bomb on us,” outfielder Torii Hunter said. “I just had a feeling that it could have been his last year. All year, he was kind of emotional, and I just felt it.”

Leyland said there was no announcement Saturday because he wanted the focus to be on the victorious Red Sox. However, he was honest about how much this defeat hurt.

“With all due respect to the Boston Red Sox — who earned it, they won it, they deserve to be where they are — I truly believe the Detroit Tigers should be playing here tomorrow,” Leyland said. “This is one that’s going to stick with me, this is one that really hurts, because I really felt like we let it get away.”

(Continued on page 2)

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