Editor’s note: Coming next week, the American Journal will publish a story examining the local MEA results.

Schools have received their first set of scores for achievement tests given in grades 3 through 8 in an expanded testing program required under the federal No Child Left Behind Act.

In years past, only students in grades 4, 8 and 11 were assessed. This year grades 3, 5, 6 and 7 were added and the tests were changed at all levels, making comparisons to previous years somewhat meaningless.

Students in fourth and eighth grade were tested in reading, math and science, while only reading and math were tested in all other elementary and middle school grades. All students in 11th grade were given the college preparatory SAT for the first time this year, and those scores have not yet been compiled statewide although individuals have received their scores.

In her announcement of the scores, Education Commissioner Susan Gendron said they will serve as a baseline for future test results. Under No Child Left Behind, school districts are required to make progress each year.

The tests still rank students as exceeding, meeting, partially meeting or failing to meet standards, but a new set of standards has been established as part of a statewide effort to match up what’s being taught in the classroom with what educators believe students should be learning at each grade level.

“You can’t really draw a comparison from this baseline year and old scores,” said Valerie Seaberg, Gendron’s chief of staff.

Scores for individual schools are at www.maine.gov/education/mea/edmea.htm.

Statewide at the third-grade level in reading: 3 percent of students exceeded standards; 62 percent met them; 27 percent partially met them; and 8 percent did not meet them. In mathematics: 9 percent exceeded; 49 percent met; 29 percent partially met; and 12 percent did not meet.

At the fourth-grade level in reading: 4 percent exceeded standards; 57 percent met them; 29 percent partially met; and, 10 percent did not meet them. In mathematics: 9 percent exceeded; 50 percent met; 27 percent partially met; and 14 percent did not meet. In science: 5 percent exceeded; 52 percent met; 32 percent partially met; and 10 percent did not meet.

At the fifth-grade level in reading: 5 percent exceeded standards; 53 percent met them; 30 percent partially met; and, 11 percent did not meet them. In mathematics: 10 percent exceeded; 45 percent met; 28 percent partially met; and 17 percent did not meet.

At the sixth-grade level in reading: 8 percent exceeded standards; 51 percent met them; 27 percent partially met them; and 13 percent did not meet them. In mathematics: 10 percent exceeded; 40 percent met; 30 percent partially met; and 20 percent did not meet.

At the seventh-grade level in reading: 11 percent exceeded standards; 49 percent met them; 24 percent partially met them; and 16 percent did not meet them. In mathematics, 11 percent exceeded standards, 36 percent met; 29 percent partially met; and, 25 percent did not meet.

At the eighth-grade level in reading: 17 percent exceeded standards; 42 percent met them; 23 percent partially met them; and, 18 percent did not meet them. In mathematics: 11 percent exceeded; 34 percent met; 29 percent partially met; and, 26 percent did not meet. In science: 12 percent exceeded; 53 percent met; 22 percent partially met; and, 13 percent did not meet.


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