I write in response to the editorial regarding older drivers and driver safety issues in Maine: “Our View: Blanket limits on license renewals not the way to cut senior driver risk” (Dec. 11). The editorial raises some important points.

We can all agree that increasing the number of safe and conscientious drivers on the road can make our communities safer for all.

In addition, developing transportation alternatives and assessing ways to reduce accidents caused by poor signage or traffic signals are important steps as well. For example, eliminating the need for dangerous left turns at busy intersections could reduce accidents for drivers of all ages.

Helping people stay engaged and active as they age should also be a focus, since many older Mainers who no longer drive risk becoming isolated. Maine’s older population is growing, and we need to begin thinking more about transportation alternatives. Data shows that on any given day, half of people who no longer drive are stuck at home.

That’s why we want to help drivers refresh their skills and why we offer AARP Driver Safety courses in classrooms and online. AARP also offers the Car Fit program to help people make sure they are maximizing the safety features in their vehicles. You can find a suite of driver safety resources through AARP’s Driver Resource Center at http:// bit.ly/1cqxlqX.

As Maine continues to age, there will be a growing number of older drivers on the road, and AARP is committed to working with individuals, families and communities to ensure roads are safe as the state continues to explore opportunities and solutions to address the influx.

Each one of us has the responsibility to help keep Maine’s roads safe by being careful drivers ourselves and by working with our own community leaders to improve road conditions and develop transportation alternatives.

Priscilla Parisien

AARP Maine Volunteer Executive Council

Portland