LINCOLN, Neb.

Two states turn to high court over legalization of marijuana

Nebraska and Oklahoma on Thursday asked the U.S. Supreme Court to declare Colorado’s legalization of marijuana unconstitutional, saying the drug is being brought from Colorado into the neighboring states.

Nebraska Attorney General Jon Bruning said the states filed a lawsuit seeking a court order to prevent Colorado from enforcing the measure known as Amendment 64, which was approved by voters in 2012. The complaint says the measure runs afoul of federal law and therefore violates the Constitution’s supremacy clause, which says federal laws trump state laws.

“This contraband has been heavily trafficked into our state,” Bruning said at a news conference in Lincoln. “While Colorado reaps millions from the sale of pot, Nebraska taxpayers have to bear the cost.”

Oklahoma Attorney General Scott Pruitt said Colorado’s decision has hindered his state’s efforts to enforce its anti-marijuana laws.

“As the state’s chief legal officer, the attorney general’s office is taking this step to protect the health and safety of Oklahomans,” Pruitt said in a statement.

PHOENIX

Judge paves way for young immigrants to get licenses

A judge cleared the way Thursday for thousands of young immigrants in Arizona who are protected from deportation under an Obama administration policy to get driver’s licenses.

The preliminary injunction issued by U.S. District Judge David Campbell bars the state from enforcing Gov. Jan Brewer’s policy of denying the licenses to about 20,000 immigrants.

The injunction that takes effect on Monday was a formality that carries out instructions issued in July by the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals.

Nora Preciado, one of the attorneys who pressed the challenge of the state policy, said the injunction eliminates the rule change that made it difficult or impossible for young immigrants to do essential things such as go to school and stores, and find and hold a job.

“This has been a terrible harm to them and has really stunted their ability to contribute to Arizona and their communities,” Preciado said.

The governor’s office had no immediate comment on the injunction..

MONTREAL

Woman who aided ducks sentenced in fatal accident

A Canadian woman who caused a fatal traffic accident after stopping her car to help ducks on a busy highway was sentenced Thursday to 90 days in prison and a 10-year driving ban.

Emma Czornobaj was convicted by a jury on two counts of criminal negligence for causing death and two counts of dangerous driving causing death. The 25-year-old was charged in the deaths of Andre Roy, 50, and his daughter Jessie, 16.

– From news service reports