LAKE BUENA VISTA, Fla. — Carrying their bats and gloves, they leave the weight room and walk the palm tree-lined path past the baseball diamonds to the track.

Weight sleds and tires await the boys of summer for the kind of workouts typically reserved for men who make their living on the gridiron in the fall. At the Coach Tom Shaw Performance camp at Disney’s Wide World of Sports Complex, it’s common to see Carlos Gonzalez, Martin Prado, Ender Inciarte and several other major leaguers working out alongside football players preparing for the NFL combine and doing the same kind of drills.

Players believe these nontraditional winter workouts, a mix of strength- and endurance-training, football cutting drills and some more common baseball moves, make them quicker, more prepared for spring training and better equipped to stay healthy for the 162-game season.

“Quickness, footwork, all the stuff you use in baseball he perfectly adapted to our workouts,” said Prado, an infielder for the Miami Marlins who has been working out with Shaw since October as part of his ninth year in the program. “He tried over the years to combine football workouts with less intensity for baseball players. … He mixes it up in a way that you actually feel comfortable working out with football kind of workouts but converting to baseball.”

Shaw won three Super Bowls as speed and conditioning coach of the New England Patriots, and his facility is known as a place where Dallas Cowboys quarterback Dak Prescott, potential draftees and other football players come for intense workouts. He had no baseball background prior to nine years ago when Prado and Jordan Schafer were among the first players from that sport to seek out a different kind of offseason training regimen.

Over the better part of the past decade, more players have joined, including Cleveland Indians shortstop Francisco Lindor, Seattle Mariners infielder Dee Gordon and Milwaukee Brewers utility player Hernan Perez. Gonzalez tried the program after injuries limited him to 70 games in 2014, and he has since rounded back into All-Star form with 79 home runs and 254 RBI.

“What we all do here, we feel ready,” Gonzalez said. “We feel ready from the get-go, from the first day of spring training. Obviously your body’s going to feel stronger and you’re mentally prepared, too. … It’s a great way to keep us in great shape during the offseason. When you feel that strong and you feel healthy, all you’ve got to do is just maintain through spring training and the regular season.”

RAYS: Owner Stuart Sternberg wants to make a historic neighborhood in Tampa the next home of the perennially low-drawing team, which wants to shift across the bay from St. Petersburg.

Sternberg said at a news conference the Rays will focus their new ballpark search on the east side of the bay at a 14-acre site in Ybor City, just north of Ybor Channel.

It’s the first time the team has publicly stated its preference for Tampa over St. Petersburg, its home since the franchise started play in 1998.

PIRATES: Outfielder Daniel Nava finalized a minor league contract with Pittsburgh and will report to major league spring training.

Nava, 34, batted .301 with eight doubles, four homers and 21 RBI in 80 games for Philadelphia last year. He played for the Portland Sea Dogs in 2009.

ARBITRATION: Pitcher Mike Foltynewicz went to salary arbitration with the Atlanta Braves over a difference of $100,000, the smallest gap in a hearing since 1994.

The 26-year-old right-hander asked Gary Kendellen, Mark Burstein and Walt De Treux for a raise from $544,000 to $2.3 million in his first year of arbitration eligibility. The Braves argued for $2.2 million during Friday’s hearing.

Players have a 7-4 record with two awaiting decisions and 10 scheduled to be heard. The case involving Cleveland pitcher Trevor Bauer, which was heard Thursday, will not be decided until late next week.