ORLANDO, Fla. — The NFL’s new rule outlawing a player from lowering his head to initially make any sort of hit with his helmet likely will be included in replay reviews for officials.

That has not been decided yet, but Commissioner Roger Goodell and competition committee chairman Rich McKay made it clear Wednesday that video reviews probably will be part of the process.

“If we’re able to have replay confirm one of these fouls and also confirm a player be ejected,” Goodell said as the league meetings concluded, “I think there is more confidence among the coaches it will be called accurately.”

After noting the unanimous approval of the new rule among coaches, Goodell said on-field officials felt the same way.

“We think that is appropriate to do and it would be the first time we use replay for safety or in respect to any kind of foul,” Goodell added.

The owners rewrote the rule on using the helmet, making it a 15-yard penalty for any player to lower his head to initiate any hit with the helmet.

McKay called it “a significant change,” noting that it was a “technique too dangerous for the player doing it and the player being hit.”

While the offender could be disqualified, owners did not call for an automatic ejection on such a play – at least not yet. In college football, when a player is penalized for targeting and a replay review affirms it, he is ejected.

Including replay will be discussed and very possibly implemented at the NFL’s May meetings in Atlanta, where another full agenda will include discussions of changes to the league’s national anthem policy; the potential sale of the Carolina Panthers; and awarding the 2019 and 2020 drafts to two of the five finalist cities.

Before then, Goodell stressed that the workings of the new helmet use rule will be made clear to the players, and there will be further discussions on the standards to go from disqualifying a player to fines and possibly suspensions.

“Our intent is to go to each team with tape and all the analysis work done (by the football operations, technology and medical staffs) and be able to present it to them,” Goodell said, adding it will be “all hands on deck” in the educational process.

“We can take the head out, and we do want to make sure certain techniques are not used in our game. I am confident in the next few months (players) will understand it.”

Also on Wednesday:

Goodell said any findings in the investigation of the behavior of Carolina Panthers owner Jerry Richardson will be made public once the probe is concluded. There is no timetable for that.

Richardson has been accused of workplace misconduct, and in December said he was selling the team. The league hopes a buyer can be found in the next few weeks, vetted and then presented for approval at the May meetings.

The league eliminated the requirement that a team that scores a winning touchdown at the end of regulation kick the extra point or go for a 2-point conversion.

In a January playoff game that Minnesota memorably won on a final pass play, New Orleans players were required to return to the field for a meaningless extra point. The Vikings took a knee.

GIANTS: ESPN reported on Wednesday as the NFL’s annual meetings came to a close that the asking price for New York receiver Odell Beckham Jr. is “at least two first-round picks.”

Co-owner John Mara said on Tuesday that he could not promise or guarantee that Beckham would be on the team in 2018, although that is his desire. Asked if it was just a matter of receiving an “overwhelming offer” for the superstar receiver, Mara said: “I think you could say that about anything.”

TRADES: According to reports, Denver acquired safety Su’a Cravens from Washington. Denver and Washington will flip fourth- and fifth-round picks this season as part of the trade. In addition, Denver sends a fifth-rounder to Washington in 2018 and a conditional sixth-round pick in 2020.

Cleveland traded former starting quarterback Cody Kessler to Jacksonville. The Browns receive a conditional 2019 seventh-round draft pick.

RAIDERS: The Las Vegas Stadium Authority has signed documents necessary to build the future home of the Raiders.

Team President Marc Badain and authority chairman Steve Hill signed the lease and development agreements on Wednesday for the $1.8 billion, 65,000-seat stadium that also will serve as home to the UNLV Rebels.

SAINTS: Tight end Benjamin Watson is expected to sign a 1-year deal to rejoin New Orleans after he led the Ravens in receptions in 2017. Watson played for the Saints in 2013-14.

Cardinals: Arizona has gone across the Atlantic to sign defensive lineman Moubarak Djeri, a 6-foot-3, 275-pounder who played the last two seasons in the German Football League. Last year, he had 12 sacks, 40 tackles, 10 tackles for loss and two forced fumbles.