Communities across southern Maine went to the polls Tuesday to validate school budgets for 2019-2020, with many approving education spending plans by wide margins despite low polling numbers.

Overall voter turnout was expected to be low without a statewide ballot. Secretary of State Matthew Dunlap anticipated that about 10 percent of Maine’s 1 million voters would make it to the polls, with pockets as high as 25 percent in cities and towns deciding major local issues.

In Portland, 71 percent of voters approved a $117.4 million school budget that will maintain staffing levels while implementing universal pre-kindergarten. The school board reduced the budget by $450,000 at the direction of the city council. The vote was 1,483 to 602.

Portland residents will see an 83-cent increase in the property tax rate when combined with the municipal budget. The tax rate would increase from $22.48 to $23.31 per $1,000 of valuation and add $249 to the annual tax bill on a $300,000 home.

In South Portland, 71 percent of voters approved a $52.3 million education budget that’s up 4.6 percent from the current year. The budget increases special education instruction while eliminating three vacant educational technician positions and designates $300,000 for iPads, laptops and other technology. The vote was 846 to 342.

The combined South Portland municipal and school budgets will add 42 cents to the current property tax rate, bringing it to $18.92 and adding $105 to the annual tax bill of a $250,000 home.

Westbrook voters approved a $40.3 million school budget by a vote of 439 to 254, with 63 percent voting “yes.” It’s part of an overall $69.8 million spending plan for fiscal 2020 that will increase the property tax rate by 50 cents to $20.45 per $1,000 of assessed value. The annual tax bill on a $200,000 home will increase $100.

In Saco, 66 percent of voters approved a $40.5 million school budget, which is about 3 percent higher than the budget for the current year. The vote was 389 to 204.

The combined school and municipal budgets will add 11 cents to the current tax rate of $19.49 per $1,000 of assessed value. That increase adds $22 to the annual property tax bill of a $200,000 home.

In Falmouth, 78 percent of voters approved a nearly $36.7 million school budget by a vote of 1,578 to 453.

The combined school and municipal spending package of $53.9 million will add 52 cents to the current property tax rate of $15.62 per $1,000 of valuation and add $156 to the annual tax bill on a $300,000 home.

In Cape Elizabeth, 67 percent of voters approved a $26.9 million school budget adopted by the Town Council. The vote was 417 to 207.

The combined $42 million budget for municipal, school and county services is up 6.5 percent over current spending,  increasing the property tax rate by 74 cents or 3.9 percent to $19.76 per $1,000 of assessed value. At that rate, the annual tax bill on a $350,000 home will increase $259.

In Old Orchard Beach, 56 percent of voters approved a $15 million school budget that’s 6.6 percent higher than the current school year. The vote was 298 to 230.

Combined with the $18.8 million municipal budget, Old Orchard’s spending plan for fiscal 2020 will add 50 cents to the current $15.30 property tax rate and add $100 to the annual tax bill on a $200,000 home.

Scarborough also easily approved a proposed $56 million school budget that went to referendum without major controversy for the first time in recent history. Voters passed the budget by a vote of 1,814 to 644.

Scarborough’s combined $68.8 million municipal and school spending proposal is 4 percent higher than the current $66.1 million plan. It will increase the current $16.49 property tax rate by 49 cents or 2.99 percent. The annual tax bill on a $300,000 home is expected to increase $147.