Editorials
  • Published
    January 18, 2011

    Our View: Stuxnet virusa way to fight without bombs

    It has been called "the most sophisticated cyberweapon ever created," and new reports coming out about the Stuxnet virus say that although it didn't stop Iran's efforts to build a nuclear weapon, it may have set back progress by several years, buying valuable time to halt the program without using military force.<br><br> Even more interesting, the virus is now said to have been a joint production of both U.S. and Israeli security agencies. The United States reportedly contributed knowledge of the vulnerabilities of the Siemens computers used by Iran, and Israel tested the virus on the centrifuges it uses to enrich uranium to produce its own substantial nuclear arsenal.<br><br> Whether these reports are confirmed or not, there seems little question that the virus has given Iran's nuclear production program fits. According to descriptions of its effects, the virus not only caused nearly a thousand Iranian centrifuges to self-destruct, it sent false messages of normal operations to controllers so they wouldn't interfere until the virus had done the maximum amout of damage.

  • Published
    January 18, 2011

    Our View: More should join move for bipartisan seating at speech

    The State of the Union address is a great opportunity for Congress to display unity.

  • Published
    January 17, 2011

    Our View: Maine can’t stand still in school reform efforts

    While other states improve, Maine is in a holding pattern, and slipping in the rankings.

  • Published
    January 16, 2011

    Another View: Postal Service is changing to meet marketplace’s demands

    A recent editorial identified the right problem, but missed the solutions.

  • Published
    January 16, 2011

    Our Views: Small-scale proposal big idea on power use

    The deal offered to some wind farm neighbors provides a model of how to heat with electricity.

  • Published
    January 15, 2011

    Our View: The whole world is listening, Gov. LePage

    The governor undermines his own agenda when he makes comments like Friday's.

  • Published
    January 14, 2011

    Our View: Obama struckright note in Tucson speech

    President Obama said what needed to be said Wednesday night at a service for the slain and injured of the Tucson, Ariz., shooting rampage.<br /><br />"At a time when our discourse has become so sharply polarized -- at a time when we are far too eager to lay the blame for all that ails the world at the feet of those who think differently than we do -- it's important for us to pause for a moment and make sure that we are talking with each other in a way that heals, not a way that wounds."

  • Published
    January 13, 2011

    Our View: Attorney general right to join Obamacare suit

    Critics are making a judgment call, but are not the ones with the power to settle the question.

  • Published
    January 12, 2011

    Our View: Don’t overreactto new fluoride studies

    The debate over fluoridation of water got some new life last week when the federal government issued new guidelines for the use of fluoride in public water systems.<br><br> Maine officials followed up a few days later with the announcement that the state would call for a reduction in the fluoride added to municipal water systems to prevent tooth decay.<br><br> Fluoride has been controversial since its introduction into water systems in the 1940s. Generations of grass-roots activists have said it causes everything from cancer to communism.

  • Published
    January 11, 2011

    Our View: Critics too quickto find politics behind shooting

    When faced with a crime as horrible as last weekend's mass killing in Arizona, it's human nature to look for a villain as big as the crime.<br><br> Before accurate details emerged about the rampage, in which a clearly troubled young man opened fire on U.S. Rep. Gabrielle Giffords, gravely wounding her, killing six bystanders and injuring 13 others, attempts were being made to put this act into a bigger political context.<br><br> Talk radio, the tea party and un-civil political discourse were batted around as contributing factors in the case even before the media on the scene could consistently report whether the shooter had acted with an accomplice or if Giffords was alive or dead.


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