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Revisiting the Penobscot River two years after dams’ removal

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    The Penobscot River at the site where the Great Works Dam used to stand. Gregory Rec/Staff Photographer

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    Dan McCaw, a fisheries biologist with the Penobscot Nation's Department of Natural Resources, stands on a bank of the Penobscot River in Veazie where the Veazie Dam used to be. “Unless you had been here before, it is hard to imagine,” McCaw said of the former dam.
 The timber slabs in the foreground are left over from the lumber mills that used to line the river many years ago. “It’s amazing stuff,” McCaw said. “It is quite a connection to Maine’s timber history.” Gregory Rec/Staff Photographer

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    Laura Rose Day, executive director of the Penobscot River Restoration Trust, stands on the side of the Penobscot River near where the Great Works Dam used to be. “I really think the project represents people stepping outside of their silos and saying, ‘Let’s pretend for a minute that we can focus on what we all have in common,’” said Day. “If people didn’t do that, we wouldn’t be standing here. We would be swimming.” Gregory Rec/Staff Photographer

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    Jan Sockbeson swims in the Penobscot River near where the Veazie Dam used to be. Sockbeson lives near the river and comes down often to explore and swim in the river. “It’s been great,” Sockbeson said. “I’m learning so much about the river as I’ve been coming down here.” Gregory Rec/Staff Photographer

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    Barbara Wilson lived above the Veazie Dam for 40 years and used to refer to the dam as "her waterfall." She was initially opposed to the dam removal but says she now likes having the Penobscot River run free below her home. Gregory Rec/Staff Photographer

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    Barbara Wilson lived above the Veazie Dam for 40 years in the house at left in this photo. Gregory Rec/Staff Photographer

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    In this file 2012 file photo, Great Works Dam removal started with ceremony lead by Penobscot Nation. This is the dam in Old Town on the Penobscot River. Gordon Chibroski / Staff Photographer

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    In this 2013 file photo, using excavators, construction workers breach the Veazie Dam in preparation for its removal on the Penobscot River in Orono. Gordon Chibroski/ Staff Photographer.

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    In this 2012 filre photo, Great Works Dam on the Penobscot River is prepared for removal by a crew from R.F. Jordan and Sons Construction Inc. They were building an access road to the Dam. Shawn Patrick Ouellette/Staff Photographer

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    On July 22, 2013, construction workers breached the Veazie Dam, upper left, in preparation for its removal on the Penobscot River in Eddington. Gordon Chibroski/ Staff Photographer

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