I am writing in response to the opinion piece by Gloria Feldt that ran in the Aug. 8 Maine Sunday Telegram (“‘Friday Night Lights’ shows its mettle by telling honest abortion story”).

Feldt attempts to wax sentimentally about a television show and its “honest” portrayal of a girl choosing abortion. Apparently, any other choice would have been induced by the “emerging political right” or by “stereotypes.”

Right. The Ellen Page character in “Juno” went to a “dismal” abortion clinic and “predictably bolts.” The woman in “Knocked Up” chose to keep the baby conceived with a “mediocre man.” Oh the horror. Oh the inconvenience.

So, as I read the last paragraph, it became clear that Feldt was no less polarized and relied on stereotypes no less than the fictional situations she chose to illustrate her point. I am guessing that, if Becky had chosen to have the baby and Juno had chosen an abortion, she might have been celebrating a different story.

Juno struggled with her choice. And she opted for a direction displeasing to Feldt. So she is condemned and the evil “right” is blamed.

I am a Democrat. I am against abortion. I think it’s an awful, awful thing to do to emerging life. As a psychologist, I am also aware of the enduring pain suffered by many women (and the men involved) who regret their choice to abort.

Ms. Feldt only applauds this television show because of the choice she made herself, not the struggle the character went through.

There will be no meaningful debate until abortion advocates begin to validate that this is, in fact, not only a difficult choice but a barbaric act in itself.

Wouldn’t it be nice for Ms. Feldt and others to begin efforts to decrease unwanted pregnancies and improve the pathways towards adoption, instead of advocating for the selfish act of abortion for sheer convenience.