Now I can’t rightly say if you’ve been naughty or nice this year. So whether or not you get some nice presents versus a stocking full of coal and clothespins this holiday season is going to depend on Santa and his elves.

What I can do, however, is suggest a few gift ideas for my hiking and camping friends, stuff you can put on your list and hope that the jolly fellow in the red and white suit comes through.

I’ve spent some time with our outdoor retailer friends recently, scouring the websites and sleuthing through the stores looking for products that would make interesting and useful holiday gifts, some with a Maine connection.

It’s been a real fun way to get into the spirit of the season and I’ve managed to get a little of my own shopping done as well. A few things for me, some for others — you know how it goes.

So here are some suggestions, with holiday cheer from me to you:

Travel scale and alarm: To help keep pack weight down when heading out on the trail, try this hand-held scale that measures up to 88 pounds, way more than you’ll ever need. And when you’re traveling by air to some far off hiking destination, you can use it to keep your pack under 50 pounds and avoid expensive baggage fees. Uses two hands, has digital readout, alarm clock and flashlight. Find it at L.L. Bean for $30, www.llbean.com.

Wildlife T-shirts: You want to be some kind of stylish around town and on the trail, don’t you? Then you’ve got to have a T-shirt embroidered with the Maine Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife insignia and your choice of a moose, deer, trout or bass.

These wicked sharp shirts are warden green and are available in short or long sleeve. Get them at Kittery Trading Post for $15 to $17, www.kitterytradingpost.com.

Appalachian Trail jewelry: Tarma Designs makes finely crafted pendants and earrings that feature Appalachian Trail hikers, blazes and logos. Each beautiful piece is made from stainless steel with a sand-blasted finish and laser-etched with the AT trademark. The company donates $1 from every purchase to the Appalachian Trail Conservancy to help maintain the 2,175-mile trail. The Ultimate Appalachian Trail Store has them for $27 to $31, www.atctrailstore.org.

Therm-a-rest Wrap-It Pillow: Do you sleep on a comfortable and lightweight Therm-A-Rest inflatable mattress when you’re out on the trail? If not, you’re probably missing out on a good night’s rest. If you own one, then you’ve got to add the companion Wrap-It Pillow, which performs triple duty as a compression sack for the mattress, protection against the elements and wear, and as a pillow sack. Stuff the microfleece-covered sleeve with extra clothes and you’ll be counting sheep in no time. Find it at Campmor for $23, www.campmor.com.

Survival pack: When I first discovered the Adventure Medical Kits SOL Survival Pak, I thought it stood for, well, something else. Turns out, the acronym is for Survive Outdoors Longer. The pack comes with all the stuff you need in a survival situation and no frilly extras; 6 ounces of good trail insurance. Eastern Mountain Sports sells them for $25, www.ems.com.

Lightweight headlamp: The Black Diamond Gizmo may be the perfect headlamp for trail or camp. It’s super lightweight at 2.8 ounces and uses just two AAA batteries. The pivoting head holds three LED bulbs that put out an impressive 24 lumens and can reach 16 meters into the dark.

There’s a high and low setting, a strobe, and an auto shut-off feature just in case you fall asleep while reading. Get yours from Recreational Equipment Incorporated in a choice of collars for $20, www.rei.com.

State park passes: Give the gift of access to the great outdoors with Maine state park passes for the 2011 season.

Friends and family are sure to enjoy them in their holiday stockings. And come summer they’ll be able to visit our incredible wealth of parks and historic sites that range from the Atlantic to Aroostook.

Get a day-use vehicle pass for $70, or a day-use individual pass for $35.

Purchase from the Maine Department of Conservation online at www.maine.gov/doc or by calling 287-2209.

Carey Kish of Bowdoin is a freelance writer and avid hiker. Send comments and hike suggestions to:

[email protected]