HAMBURG, Germany — Initial tests have confirmed that bean sprouts grown in northern Germany are the likely cause of an E. coli outbreak that has killed at least 22 people and sickened over 2,200, an agriculture official said Sunday.

Different kinds of sprouts from one organic farm in the greater Uelzen area, between the northern cities of Hamburg and Hannover, could be traced to infected persons in five different German states, Lower Saxony Agriculture Minister Gert Lindemann told reporters.

“There were more and more indications in the last few hours that put the focus on this farm,” Lindemann said at a press conference in Hannover.

“Many restaurants that suffered from an E. coli outbreak had those sprouts delivered,” his spokesman, Gert Hahne, told The Associated Press.

The farm was shut down Sunday and all of its produce – including fresh herbs, fruits, flowers and potatoes – was recalled. At least one of the farm’s employees was also infected with the E.coli bacteria, the minister said.

Lindemann said 18 different sprout mixtures were under suspicion — including sprouts of beans, broccoli, peas, chickpeas, garlic lentils, mungo beans and radish. The sprouts are often used in mixed salads.