PHILADELPHIA – Stan Lee’s had a hand in creating many memorable heroes and villains that have jumped from the pages of comic books to popular culture.

Now, he’s aiming to bring new stories for an impressionable audience: kids.

The former longtime editor of Marvel Comics and founder of POW! Entertainment will unveil the imprint Stan Lee’s Kids Universe with 1821 Comics on Friday at New York Comic Con, featuring a roster of kid-friendly and even parent-approved characters ranging from The Fuzz Posse, a group of police dogs, to Reggie the Veggie Crocodile.

“The whole idea is to give them the kind of stories that they haven’t read before that they can easily understand and relate to,” Lee said ahead of the announcement. “While we want these to be reasonably educational and good for kids – that goes without saying – but our main purpose to be entertaining … kids have a great sense of humor if you can reach them the right way.”

The characters were created during brainstorming sessions between Paris Kasidokostas Lastis and Terry Dougas of 1821 and Lee.

Dougas said he and Lee have worked for eight years together on ideas and characters for film and television, but both decided that the market for comics, graphic novels, books and games for children was ripe for a new universe.

“So Stan and I started discussing … to start a label for kids.”

And that led to the new universe, which Dougas said carries not just the gravitas of Lee’s name but also a banner of creativity.

“We’re not on a crusade of any sort. Our main purpose is we feel that there aren’t enough comic books or books for kids that really hit the target, that is that gives them excitement and humor together and are filled with surprises,” Lee said. “And have a whole new group of new characters that the kids can call their own, just as the teenagers called Spider-Man their own so many years ago.”

Suspected hacker of celebrity email to appear in court

 

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. – A Florida man charged with hacking into email accounts of celebrities including actress Scarlett Johansson was ordered Friday to appear in a Los Angeles courtroom Nov. 1.

A federal magistrate judge in Jacksonville, Fla., issued the order at a hearing for Christopher Chaney, 35. He faces a 26-count indictment in California that includes charges of identity theft, unauthorized computer access and wiretapping.

At a news conference several hours later, Chaney said he regretted what happened.

“I’m very sorry for all of this,” Chaney said outside his attorney’s Jacksonville office. “What I am most sorry about is I had to direct my mom into this.”

Chaney’s parents, Cathy and Jerry, agreed to supervise their son while he is free on $10,000 bail. At the direction of his attorney, Chaney didn’t say much more at the news conference.

Chaney has not yet entered a plea. Authorities say there were more than 50 victims, including actresses Mila Kunis and Renee Olstead and singer Christina Aguilera.

“At this point, he is extremely remorseful and sympathetic to the plight of the stars,” said attorney Christopher Chestnut. “He is sorry that all of this is happening.”

Chestnut said he wanted Chaney to undergo a psychological evaluation.

‘Charlie’s Angels’ just doesn’t fly as remade series

NEW YORK – ABC says its revamped version of the 1970s hit “Charlie’s Angels” is being shut down after only four airings because of low ratings.

The network said Friday that four more episodes remain to be aired. The action series focused on three female detectives in Miami.

But the reboot has struggled in the ratings since its premiere last month. It’s ABC’s first cancellation of the new fall season.

The original “Charlie’s Angels” aired for six seasons on ABC.

Writers supporting Occupy Wall Street

NEW YORK – Salman Rushdie, Neil Gaiman and Pulitzer Prize-winning novelists Jennifer Egan and Michael Cunningham are among more than 100 authors who in an online petition are declaring their support for Occupy Wall Street.

Others supporting the protests include “Lemony Snicket” author Daniel Handler, Barbara Ehrenreich, Ann Patchett and Andre Dubus III.

The petition is at occupywriters.com.