LONDON – A London neighborhood wants its Banksy back.

A stencil by the famed but secretive graffiti artist of a young boy sewing Union Jack bunting on an antique sewing machine appeared on the side of a north London bargain store last May. Soon the gritty Turnpike Lane area was drawing art lovers keen to see Banksy’s typically cheeky take on the Diamond Jubilee celebrations of Queen Elizabeth II’s 60 years on the British throne.

Last week it vanished, leaving nothing but a rectangle of exposed brick — only to reappear on the website of a Miami auction house. Listed as “Slave Labor (Bunting Boy),” it is due to be sold Saturday with an estimated price of between $500,000 and $700,000.

London officials concede the sale is probably legal but hope moral pressure will make the auction house change its mind.

“(It’s) totally unethical that something so valued should be torn without warning from its community context,” local lawmaker Lynne Featherstone said.

Featherstone said she had yet to receive an explanation from the building’s owner. Poundland, the store that occupies the building, said it had nothing to do with the removal.

On Wednesday, the local government authority appealed to the auctioneer for the return of the work.

In an open letter to auction house chief Frederic Thut, Haringey Council called the artwork “a much-loved local landmark” that had been visited by people from around the world.

“We understand that there may be nothing illegal in the way this artwork was quietly removed from our streets and put up for auction by you in Miami,” the letter said.

“But for you to allow it to be sold for huge profit in this way would be morally wrong, and completely contrary to the spirit in which we believe it was given to our community.”

Where’s LaBeouf? Not debuting on Broadway

NEW YORK – Shia LaBeouf is pulling the plug on his Broadway debut.

The star of the “Transformers” franchise had been set to appear opposite Alec Baldwin in “Orphans” but producers said Wednesday that LaBeouf would not be continuing “due to creative differences.”

The play by Lyle Kessler, which premiered in 1983, tells the story of two orphaned brothers living in a decrepit Philadelphia row house who decide to kidnap a wealthy man. LaBeouf played one brother and Baldwin the target.

“Orphans” opens March 19 at the Schoenfeld Theatre, directed by Daniel Sullivan. Producers say they will announce LaBeouf’s replacement soon.

LaBeouf most recently starred in John Hillcoat’s crime drama “Lawless.”

Roberts says good morning, America, again

NEW YORK – Robin Roberts made her return to ABC’s “Good Morning America” Wednesday, five months to the day after receiving a bone marrow transplant and a year since she started feeling symptoms of the ailment that has sidelined her since August.

Roberts looked thin and didn’t bother to cover her hair loss with a wig. She wore a wide smile in taking her seat next to co-host George Stephanopoulos on TV’s top-rated morning show.

“I have been waiting 174 days to say this,” Roberts said. “Good morning, America.”

Most of the show turned into a celebration of her return, as she recovers from MDS, a blood and bone marrow disease. President Obama, Hillary Rodham Clinton and basketball star Magic Johnson sent taped greetings.

She plans to work two or three days a week initially.