DETROIT — Abraham Nemeth, the blind designer of the internationally recognized Nemeth Braille Math Code that simplified symbols for easier use in advanced math and science, has died at his home in suburban Detroit, relatives said Thursday. He was 94.

Nemeth, who was originally discouraged from pursuing his passion for math because of his blindness, died of congestive heart failure Wednesday at his home in Southfield, said his niece Dianne Bekritsky. She said her “uncle Abe” had passions ranging from science to music — he even worked his way through college by playing the piano in bars — and was long devoted to the blind community.

Nemeth started working on the code in the 1940s, seeking a simpler system to what was being used at the time. The New York native, who also spent 30 years as a mathematics professor at the University of Detroit Mercy, continued to develop the math code until the end of his life and has been lauded for his work by the blind community.

In 2006, Nemeth received the Louis Braille Award from the International Braille Research Center for his lifetime of work.