BUENOS AIRES, Argentina — A federal judge on Thursday firmly dismissed allegations that Argentine President Cristina Fernandez tried to cover up the involvement of Iranian officials in the 1994 bombing of a Jewish center, easing a crisis for her government fed by the death of the prosecutor who brought the case.

Judge Daniel Rafecas said the documents originally filed by the late prosecutor Alberto Nisman failed to meet “the minimal conditions needed to launch a formal court investigation.”

“There is not a single element of evidence, even circumstantial, that points to the actual head of state,” the judge said.

Nisman had filed the complaint just days before he died on Jan. 18 under mysterious circumstances. Polls show many Argentines suspect officials had some hand in the death, though Fernandez and aides have suggested the death was actually aimed at destabilizing her government.

While the decision can be appealed, the judge’s scathing wording appears to substantiate government insistence that Nisman’s case was baseless, though his death still casts a shadow across the administration.

“Rafecas’ decision gives the government some breathing room,” said Roberto Bacman, director of the Center for Public Opinion Studies, a South American research firm. Before Thursday’s decision, “the government had only been receiving bad news.”

Tens of thousands of Argentines marched through the capital last week demanding answers a month after he was found in his bathroom with a bullet in his head.