April 16, 2013

Alaska-based soldier gets 16 years in spy case

Military prosecutors paint William Colton Millay as a white supremacist who was fed up with the Army and the United States, and was willing to sell secrets to an enemy agent.

Mark Thiessen / The Associated Press

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Spc. William Colton Millay is shown in an undated photo released by U.S. Army Alaska.

AP

Chriswell also testified that Millay has two Nazi SS thunderbolt tattoos under his biceps and spider web tattoos, which he said was common among racists in prison.

"He branded himself in their symbols of hate," military prosecutor Capt. Stewart Hyderkhan said in his closing statement, arguing for at least 25 years in prison. "He had hate for the Army. He had hate for the United States."

Millay's attorney, Seattle-based Charles Swift, argued that the Nazi movement and Russia don't exactly have a lot in common, and that Millay had once been married to Filipino.

Defense witness Dr. Veronica Harris, a psychiatrist, testified Millay had the emotional capability of a 5-year-old and suffers from low self-esteem, mild depression, alcoholism and narcissism.

"I know I've made a terrible mistake," Millay said in court Monday. "I'm a U.S. soldier, and that piece of me, I'm proud of."

Hyderkhan said jailhouse recordings show Millay threatens to continue to divulge secrets.

Swift, in his closing statement, argued that eight years was punitive enough and would provide time for rehabilitation.

The panel recommended a 19-year sentence, but that was dropped to 16 years because of a pretrial agreement. Millay will receive credit for the 535 days he's been jailed since his arrest. The panel also reduced him in rank to private and he will forfeit all pay and allowances.

Swift said he accepts the sentence but will seek further clemency.

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