January 16

Move over for Maine police, or pull over – for ticket

Maine troopers begin enforcing a 2007 law to protect emergency vehicles parked along the road after six crashes since December.

By Dennis Hoey dhoey@pressherald.com
Staff Writer

State police say they have begun enforcing a 2007 law that requires drivers to move over and slow down for parked emergency vehicles and wreckers along Maine roads, in response to six accidents in which cruisers were hit.

click image to enlarge

A car drives past Maine State Trooper Chris Rogers during a traffic stop in West Gardiner. Maine law requires a driver to slow down when approaching a parked emergency vehicle and move into an adjacent lane, if it’s safe to do so.

Andy Molloy/2013 Kennebec Journal file

State police say they have begun enforcing a 2007 law that requires drivers to move over and slow down for parked emergency vehicles along Maine roads, in response to six accidents in which cruisers were hit.

Staff File Photo

Any driver who is videotaped by police violating the “move over” law will be issued a summons and fined $311. The violation will also go on their driving record.

The renewed enforcement, which began this week on the Maine Turnpike, follows six incidents since December in which drivers hit state police cruisers after the troopers had pulled someone over or stopped to help a motorist.

Each cruiser sustained significant damage, and four troopers suffered injuries. State police said two of those troopers have been unable to return to their patrol duties.

Officers said the accidents happen when drivers are distracted and driving too fast. They said more special details like the one Monday night on the turnpike are needed to protect troopers’ lives. A total of 11 drivers were summoned for violating the law.

“When you see a police officer stopped along the road with their emergency lights on, it’s time to slow down and move over to give them room to work,” Col. Robert Williams, chief of the state police, said in a news release issued Wednesday. “The move over law is designed to reduce the risk to emergency workers stopped along the highway.”

Steve McCausland, a spokesman for the state Department of Public Safety, said the law was adopted by the Legislature in 2007 to protect people in emergency vehicles and in stopped vehicles with their emergency lights flashing. Every state has adopted some type of move over law, with Hawaii becoming the last in 2012.

Maine State Police said they have not made a concerted effort to enforce the law until now.

Maine’s law requires a driver to slow down to a reasonable speed when approaching a parked emergency vehicle and move into an adjacent lane, if it’s safe to do so.

“I think that now is the time to start enforcing this law,” said Cpl. Lance McCleish of Troop G, which is assigned to patrol the turnpike. “I’ve been watching as my co-workers get hurt and are being forced to miss work.”

McCleish said a big part of the enforcement problem has been manpower. When a trooper is issuing a citation to a driver, it’s unlikely that he or she would break it off to pursue a driver who drove too close to the cruiser.

Members of Troop G, under the command of Lt. Kevin Donovan, decided they had seen enough of their fellow officers getting injured.

In two hours on Monday night, troopers stopped 40 drivers on the turnpike in Portland for an assortment of violations. Eleven drivers were cited for violating the move over law.

The troopers worked as a team. Three videotaped drivers who made no effort to avoid a cruiser that had stopped on the side of the road. Several drivers could easily have shifted lanes, police said.

“One guy challenged me and said isn’t this (fine) a bit harsh,” McCleish said. “I don’t think most people think this is a big deal.”

Donovan said the law is a big deal, and the state police can’t afford to lose more men and women to drivers who are speeding and not paying attention to their surroundings.

“The enforcement is going to continue until the message has been received by the driving public,” he said.

Last week, state police cruisers were hit and damaged in Portland, Brewer and Lincoln. In December, cruisers were hit by drivers in York, Manchester and Sanford.

(Continued on page 2)

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