January 9, 2013

America heating up quickly, experts report

Drought and a mild winter drive up the average annual temperature by an unprecedented full degree.

The Associated Press

WASHINGTON - America set an off-the-charts heat record in 2012.

Timmy Benson
click image to enlarge

Timmy Benson wears a wet towel as he cools off in a fountain before a Cardinals game in St. Louis last July 6. Federal meteorologists say the average U.S. temperature in 2012 was 55.32 degrees, 1 degree warmer than the previous record of 1998. Normally, records are broken by about a tenth of a degree.

The Associated Press

A brutal combination of a widespread drought and a mostly absent winter pushed the average annual U.S. temperature last year up to 55.32 degrees Fahrenheit, the government announced Tuesday -- a full degree warmer than the old record set in 1998.

Breaking temperature records by an entire degree is unprecedented, scientists say. Normally, records are broken by a tenth of a degree or so.

"It was off the chart," said Deke Arndt, head of climate monitoring at the National Climatic Data Center in Asheville, N.C., which calculated the temperature records.

Last year, he said, will go down as "a huge exclamation point at the end of a couple decades of warming."

The data center's figures for the entire world won't come out until next week, but through the first 11 months of 2012, the world was on pace to have its eighth warmest year on record.

Scientists say the U.S. heat is part global warming in action and natural weather variations. The drought that struck almost two-thirds of the nation and a La Nina weather event helped push temperatures higher, along with climate change from man-made greenhouse gas emissions, said Katharine Hayhoe, director of the Climate Science Center at Texas Tech University. She said temperature increases are happening faster than scientists predicted.

"These records do not occur like this in an unchanging climate," said Kevin Trenberth, head of climate analysis at the National Center for Atmospheric Research in Boulder, Colo. "And they are costing many billions of dollars."

Global warming is caused by the burning of fossil fuels -- coal, oil and natural gas -- which sends heat-trapping gases, such as carbon dioxide, into the air, changing the climate, scientists say.

What's happening with temperatures in the United States is consistent with the long-term pattern of "big heat events that reach into new levels of intensity," Arndt said.

Last year was 3.2 degrees warmer than the average for the entire 20th century. Last July was the hottest month on record. Nineteen states set yearly heat records in 2012, though Alaska was cooler than average.

U.S. temperature records go back to 1895, and the yearly average is based on reports from more than 1,200 weather stations across the Lower 48 states.

Several environmental groups, including the World Wildlife Fund, took the chance to call on the Obama administration to do more to fight climate change.

According to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, 2012 also had the second-most weather extremes on record after hurricane-heavy 1998, based on a complex formula that includes temperature records, drought, downpours, and land-falling hurricanes.

 

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