April 18, 2013

Store video focus of search for Boston bomber

A man is discovered dropping a bag near the bomb site, raising hopes on a frenzied day.

By DAVID MONTGOMERY AND MARC FISHER The Washington Post

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Investigators inspect the area between the two blast sites near the Boston Marathon finish line on Thursday in Boston. Boston remained under a heavy security presence, with scores of National Guard troops gathering among armored Humvees in the Boston Common.

AP

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Jillian Blenis, 30, of Boston, reacts while stopping at a makeshift memorial, Wednesday, April 17, 2013, in Boston. The city continues to cope following Monday's explosions near the finish line of the Boston Marathon. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez)

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FOR MORE INFORMATION, visit our special section covering the Boston bombings.

CNN said it "had three credible sources on both local and federal levels" for its reports. "As soon as our sources came to us with new information, we adjusted our reporting."

In Boston, police barricades still ringed a 12-block area around the finish line, guarded by city police and the Massachusetts National Guard.

Doug Silkwood, a runner wearing his official marathon jacket, stopped at the barricade and recalled how he'd expected his first Boston Marathon to end with "hundreds of thousands of people having a great time."

The bombings dashed all that, said Silkwood, 47, an engineer from San Jose, Calif.: "It's probably easier to protect a Boston Celtics game than an open event like the marathon," but he said he plans to return next year, "to do it out of spite."

At Boston Medical Center, Jenny Chung, a 35-year-old teacher, was released at midday, less than 48 hours after shrapnel was blown into her chest, two inches from her heart.

She wore an honorary marathon finisher's medal and carried a teddy bear that relatives had sent her. The medal was a gift from a marathon volunteer; Chung did not run the race, but was a spectator, there to watch a friend whose run ended prematurely.

Chung had been poised to record her friend's triumphant finish when she was knocked to the ground. She felt little pain as she and her friends hurried away.

Only when she got to a friend's apartment did she see blood oozing from her chest. She went to the hospital, where doctors quickly operated to remove the fragment. Investigators collected all her clothing, including her sneakers, for possible clues, she said.

At the finish line, Chung had stood with her runner friend's boyfriend, who held a half dozen yellow helium balloons. Shrapnel from the blast cut open the boyfriend's calf, and popped some of the balloons. The rest slipped from his grasp as he fell.

In video of the scene, a few yellow balloons drift upward, above the carnage.

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Additional Photos

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A heavily armed United States Marshall stands guard outside the Moakley Federal Court House in Boston after the building was evacuated, Wednesday, April 17, 2013. (AP Photo/Michael Dwyer)

AP

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Officials in tactical gear stand guard behind a Boston Police Department barricade near the site of the Boston Marathon explosions, Wednesday, April 17, 2013, in Boston. The city continues to cope following Monday's explosions near the finish line of the marathon. Authorities investigating the deadly bombings have recovered a piece of circuit board that they believe was part of one of the explosive devices, and also found the lid of a pressure cooker that apparently was catapulted onto the roof of a nearby building, an official said Wednesday. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez)

 


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