March 26, 2013

Some lobstermen refuse to take bait on new surcharge

By North Cairn ncairn@pressherald.com
Staff Writer

As legislators work on a plan to provide millions of dollars to market and promote Maine lobster by adding a surcharge to licenses, some lobstermen are balking at paying for an advertising campaign that they say will take money out of their pockets without giving them much in return.

Today's poll: Lobster surcharge

Should the state put a surcharge on lobster­men to pay for a campaign to market Maine lobster?

Yes

No

View Results

"We are being forced, extorted, in an advertising scheme that we don't benefit from," said Nelson King of East Boothbay, who has been a lobsterman for more than 50 years.

"Advertising directly benefits the dealers' market," he said, so the campaign wouldn't affect prices that lobstermen get for their catch.

Lobstermen already provide about $350,000 a year to the Maine Lobster Advisory Council's budget for promotion of Maine lobster, through a surcharge on licenses.

The new proposal would change the method of funding the promotional budget by dramatically increasing surcharges on all licenses. That would allow a huge increase in the council's budget, to $3 million over three years. A separate bill would add a one-time, $1 million appropriation.

In addition, the council would be reorganized and its membership would be increased from nine to 13, with 11 members appointed by the commissioner of the state Department of Marine Resources.

The Maine Lobstermen's Association and the Downeast Lobstermen's Association have endorsed the proposal, but some lobstermen oppose license surcharges, which would vary by the type of license and whether it is for harvesting, processing, selling or transporting the catch.

The Legislature's Marine Resources Committee is scheduled to take up the bill outlining the changes, L.D. 486, at a work session Wednesday.

Officials in the Department of Marine Resources said Monday that there is wide support in the industry for the changes.

"The commissioner heard loud and clear, through the 16 meetings in January, held up and down the coast, that there is broad industry support for the surcharges and what they will accomplish ... which is improved marketing," said Jeff Nichols, director of communications for the agency.

For many lobstermen, a surcharge that is $62.50 this year would rise to $187.50 in 2014, then jump to $375.50 in 2015. The surcharge would jump again from 2016-2018, to $487.50.

After that, the success of the program would be evaluated and the surcharges could be maintained, increased or decreased, as deemed necessary by the Legislature.

Some fishermen aren't convinced that more promotional money will produce the promised results of new and bigger markets, or that any returns will trickle down to them.

"The government has no business in the business of lobster fishing," said Matt Parkhurst, a lobsterman from Boothbay. "They should butt out. Their job is to make sure we don't overfish the resource."

So far, there is no detailed plan for how the money would be used for market development or advertising for Maine lobsters. The proposal would allow a new, as-yet-unnamed, council to contract with public agencies or private companies to design and implement promotional strategies.

But King, in East Boothbay, said the reputation of Maine lobster already speaks for itself.

He said the fishermen are the ones who have done the work to sustain the fishery, and it's their attention to conservation -- not a promotional board's -- that has paid off.

"I do not believe that the Lobster Promotion Council can do anything of note to convince the world that Maine lobster is the best," he said. "That word is out already. Have you ever heard someone in a restaurant ask for one of (the) Massachusetts, Rhode Island, New Hampshire or Canadian lobsters?"

Officials with the Maine Lobstermen's Association could not be reached for comment Monday.

In testimony this month before the Marine Resources Committee, Executive Director Patrice McCarron said Maine must invest to create new markets and increase demand nationally and globally for its leading fishery.

(Continued on page 2)

Were you interviewed for this story? If so, please fill out our accuracy form

Send question/comment to the editors




Further Discussion

Here at PressHerald.com we value our readers and are committed to growing our community by encouraging you to add to the discussion. To ensure conscientious dialogue we have implemented a strict no-bullying policy. To participate, you must follow our Terms of Use.

Questions about the article? Add them below and we’ll try to answer them or do a follow-up post as soon as we can. Technical problems? Email them to us with an exact description of the problem. Make sure to include:
  • Type of computer or mobile device your are using
  • Exact operating system and browser you are viewing the site on (TIP: You can easily determine your operating system here.)


Today's poll: Lobster surcharge

Should the state put a surcharge on lobster­men to pay for a campaign to market Maine lobster?

Yes

No

View Results