January 12, 2013

Syrian rebels capture one air base, push for two more

An international envoy, who met with top Russian and U.S. diplomats, voices little hope for a peace plan.

The Associated Press

BEIRUT - Syrian rebels and Islamic militants overran a major military air base in the north Friday and, buoyed by the victory, intensified their offensive on two other bases in their most aggressive campaign yet to erode the air supremacy on which the regime of President Bashar Assad has increasingly relied the past year.

The rebels control the ground in large parts of the north, but they have been unable to solidify their grip because they -- and civilians in rebel-held regions -- come under withering strikes from aircraft stationed at a number of military bases.

The Taftanaz base in Idlib province is the largest air base to be captured by the rebels. It is the biggest field in the north for helicopters the military uses for strikes on rebels and for delivering supplies to government troops to avoid the danger of rebel attacks on the roads.

Shortly after they captured the Taftanaz field, rebels in the neighboring province of Aleppo intensified their assault on the Mannagh air base and the international airport of the city of Aleppo, which includes a military base. Rebels have been trying to capture the two sites since last week, along with a third airfield known as Kweires.

The latest fighting came as international envoy Lakhdar Brahimi expressed little hope for a political solution for Syria's nearly two-year-old civil war anytime soon after meeting Friday with senior Russian and U.S. diplomats at the United Nations' European headquarters.

Brahimi, who is the joint U.N.-Arab League envoy for Syria, met with Russian Deputy Foreign Minister Mikhail Bogdanov and U.S. Deputy Secretary of State William Burns. The talks were part of his attempts to find some traction for an international peace plan calling for creation of a new provisional government in Damascus that has so far gone nowhere.

Brahimi spoke with Assad in late December about the plan during a visit to the Syrian capital. Days afterward, Assad went on state TV with a defiant speech and a plan of his own, offering to oversee a national conciliation conference while rejecting any talks with the armed opposition and vowing to continue fighting them.

 

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