November 12, 2013

Old Sox manager edges out new Sox manager for top award

Terry Francona wins AL Manager of the Year, beating out Boston’s John Farrell.

Two championships and eight successful seasons in Boston brought Terry Francona exactly zero first-place votes in Manager of the Year balloting.

click image to enlarge

In this June 24, 2013, photo, Cleveland Indians manager Terry Francona talks to reporters before the Indians’ baseball game against the Baltimore Orioles in Baltimore. Francona was selected as the AL Manager of the Year on Tuesday, Nov. 12, 2013, by the Baseball Writers’ Association of America,

AP Photo/Nick Wass

click image to enlarge

In this Sept. 24, 2013, file photo, Cleveland Indians designated hitter Jason Giambi, left, picks up manager Terry Francona after Giambi hit a two-run home run off Chicago White Sox relief pitcher Addison Reed in the ninth inning of a baseball game in Cleveland. Francona was selected as the AL Manager of the Year on Tuesday, Nov. 12, 2013, by the Baseball Writers’ Association of America.

AP Photo/Tony Dejak

It took him one year with the surprising Cleveland Indians to bag the prize.

Francona and Clint Hurdle of the Pittsburgh Pirates won the Manager of the Year awards Tuesday after guiding their small-budget teams to charming turnarounds.

In a close vote by the Baseball Writers’ Association of America panel, Francona edged old friend John Farrell of the World Series champion Red Sox 112 points to 96 for the American League honor.

“I have a feeling he wouldn’t trade what they did for this any day of the week,” Francona said on a conference call from Tucson, Ariz.

Hurdle was a runaway winner in the NL, selected first on 25 of 30 ballots after taking the Pirates to the playoffs in their first winning season since 1992.

“It is so rewarding for me to see what’s happened, the synergy in the city,” Hurdle said in Pittsburgh. “To be a small part of a group that’s able to bring joy at so many different levels — that’s what’s rewarding to me in life.”

It was the first Manager of the Year honor for Francona, even though — in an interesting twist — he steered the Red Sox to World Series titles in 2004 and 2007. During his initial season with the Indians, he directed them to a 24-win improvement and their first playoff berth in six years.

They lost the AL wild-card game to Tampa Bay, but voting is conducted before the postseason.

Francona said he called Farrell, a longtime colleague and once his pitching coach in Boston, on Tuesday morning because he thought it was funny they were up against each other as finalists for the award.

If they heard such news years ago, Francona said, “both of us would have laughed each other out of the room.”

Hurdle also was quick with a self-deprecating joke after he won.

“There’s guys laughing all over the place,” he said in an interview on MLB Network. “The players know so many times this season we’d have a big series, getting together just trying to break the ice I’d tell them, ‘Hey, look guys, you’ve got to step it up, play big this week because I’m going to get outmanaged. I can tell you one thing that’s going to happen: I’ll get outmanaged. So really step it up.’ And they did. They believed me every series.”

Just like Francona, the 56-year-old Hurdle won Manager of the Year for the first time. His highest finish had been third in 2007, when he led Colorado to the World Series.

Don Mattingly of the NL West champion Los Angeles Dodgers came in second and Fredi Gonzalez of the NL East champion Atlanta Braves was third.

The only other Pittsburgh manager to win was Jim Leyland in 1990 and 1992, the bookends to three consecutive division titles for the Pirates.

After that, they endured a record 20 straight losing seasons — the longest drought in any of the four major professional sports — before going 94-68 this year to capture an NL wild card.

Riding a wave of excitement from a rejuvenated fan base in a city finally enthralled by baseball again, Pittsburgh beat Cincinnati in the wild-card game before losing to league champion St. Louis in a division series that went the full five games.

“I’m a realist, but I am an optimist,” said Hurdle, who has managed the Pirates for three seasons. “Everybody played a part.”

Hurdle was chosen second on the other five ballots and was the only NL manager picked on every one. He had 140 points in the 5-3-1 scoring system to 68 for Mattingly, who received two first-place votes. Gonzalez got three first-place votes and had 43 points.

(Continued on page 2)

Were you interviewed for this story? If so, please fill out our accuracy form

Send question/comment to the editors




Further Discussion

Here at PressHerald.com we value our readers and are committed to growing our community by encouraging you to add to the discussion. To ensure conscientious dialogue we have implemented a strict no-bullying policy. To participate, you must follow our Terms of Use.

Questions about the article? Add them below and we’ll try to answer them or do a follow-up post as soon as we can. Technical problems? Email them to us with an exact description of the problem. Make sure to include:
  • Type of computer or mobile device your are using
  • Exact operating system and browser you are viewing the site on (TIP: You can easily determine your operating system here.)


 

Blogs

Clearing the Bases - Friday
Pitching, pitching, pitching

More PPH Blogs

Winter sports 2013-2014

High School Football 2013

Fall sports photos