Young mother charged with abandoning baby

Security video showed nothing amiss when Frankea Dabbs – wearing dark glasses, pushing a baby stroller and pulling a rolling suitcase – entered a busy Manhattan subway station Monday night.

But after riding uptown to another stop, police say Dabbs purposely left her most precious possession behind on the subway platform: her baby girl.

Dabbs, 20, who faces charges for petty crimes in North Carolina, was arrested near Central Park on Tuesday after someone recognized her from the video released by police.

She was arraigned Tuesday on charges of abandoning a child and endangering the welfare of a child and is being held without bail. No plea was entered. Her next court date is July 11.

In a preliminary interview with detectives, Dabbs described herself as a homeless widow from North Carolina who had arrived in New York on July 2, said a spokesman for the New York Police Department.

Hospital pharmacist allegedly stole 193,000 pills

A pharmacist who oversaw a major hospital’s vault of drugs stole nearly 200,000 powerful painkillers he was supposed to safeguard and dispense, narcotics prosecutors said as they unveiled a case that makes unusual use of a state drug-kingpin law.

For more than five years before his firing this spring, Anthony D’Alessandro exploited his access to the drug supply of what is now Mount Sinai Beth Israel hospital to grab oxycodone and other pills by the hundreds and then fudged records to cover his tracks, city Special Narcotics Prosecutor Bridget Brennan’s office said. Prosecutors are still investigating what became of the drugs but believe the medications ended up on the thriving black market, where the more than 193,000 missing pills could fetch $5.6 million.


Drought drops water level at Lake Mead reservoir

Drought in the southwestern U.S is depleting the vast Lake Mead on the Colorado River to levels not seen since Hoover Dam was completed and the reservoir was filled in the 1930s.

U.S. Bureau of Reclamation officials in Nevada said the water level at the reservoir serving Las Vegas, Phoenix and Los Angeles will drop this week and should be about 1,080 feet above sea level by November.

That’ll be below the nearly 1,082 feet recorded in November 2010, and below the 1,083 feet in April 1956 during another sustained drought.

The lake level is a little under 1,082 feet, and 39 percent full.

Bureau regional chief Terry Fulp says water deliveries will be met this year and next year to cities, states, farms and Indian tribes.


No charges against men who hooked white shark

California officials say they won’t cite the fishermen who hooked a great white shark that bit a swimmer near the Manhattan Beach pier.

Authorities say the 7-foot shark was thrashing to get free from the line for more than 40 minutes Saturday before it bit a swimmer who was treated at a hospital. It’s illegal to fish for great whites in California.

The fishermen said they accidentally hooked the shark and didn’t immediately cut the line because they hoped to guide it away from swimmers.

– From news service reports