WASHINGTON — A government task force says a daily low-dose aspirin could help certain people in their 50s and 60s prevent a first heart attack or stroke – and they might get some protection against colon cancer at the same time.

The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force issued draft guidelines Monday recommending aspirin only if people meet a strict list of criteria – including a high risk of heart disease and a low risk of bleeding side effects.

The guidelines said the recommendation is strongest for 50-somethings, but that doctors should decide aspirin therapy on a case-by-case basis for people in their 60s, who can expect a smaller benefit.

Potential candidates should have at least a 10 percent risk of a heart attack or stroke over the next decade, have a life expectancy of at least 10 years and be willing to take daily aspirin that long, and not have other health conditions that cause bleeding, the guidelines said. That’s because prolonged aspirin use can trigger serious bleeding, in the gastrointestinal tract or brain.

Aspirin therapy has long been recommended for heart attack survivors, but who should try it for what’s called primary prevention – protection of a first heart attack or stroke – is less clear. And while studies suggest years of daily aspirin use may lower the risk of colon cancer, no major health organizations recommend taking it solely for that reason.