PROVIDENCE, R.I. — An undertaker, a chaplain and a soldier walk onto a plane and then jump out.

It’s no joke: Eight state lawmakers, a lawmaker’s wife and a former legislator plan to skydive Sunday to raise money for the Rhode Island Community Food Bank.

Rep. Robert Nardolillo, the organizer, works at his family’s funeral home. The participants include Rep. Robert Lancia, a former Navy chaplain, and Rep. James McLaughlin, an Army veteran.

Nardolillo invited the entire General Assembly and the state’s general officers to take part.

He said he’s thrilled with the turnout.

“We’re not kayaking for a cause – we’re skydiving,” he said.

House Speaker Nicholas Mattiello declined. He joked he’s reluctant to skydive with an undertaker. “Unless there is an engine malfunction, I have no plans to jump out of any airplane,” he said.

Food bank CEO Andrew Schiff said it’s a novel, exciting way to draw attention to the cause, and a “first for us.”

Nardolillo has gone skydiving once before. He said he thought inviting his colleagues could be an “out of the box” way to aid a charity.

The food bank’s website is accepting donations for the event. Nardolillo said he hopes they can raise $2,000. Some who were invited to jump donated instead, including the state’s treasurer, he added.

Both McLaughlin and Lancia, a disabled veteran, will be skydiving for the first time. At first, Lancia didn’t want to go.

But early Thursday, Lancia texted Nardolillo to see if he could still jump to support the food bank.

Lancia said he’ll be prepared to lead a prayer aboard the plane, if called upon.

“I’m asked to pray all the time,” he said. “There’s that expression: ‘There are no atheists in foxholes.’ Maybe there are no atheists in small airplanes.”

The group of 10 is scheduled to fly out of Middletown with Skydive Newport on Sunday.

Reps. Jean Philippe Barros, Doreen Costa, Robert Craven, John Edwards and Karen MacBeth, along with former Rep. Charles Knowles and Nancy Phillips, the wife of Rep. Robert Phillips, plan to jump, each with a tandem instructor.

They’re calling it a “legislative leap.”