Imagine being unable to breathe or even move, feeling trapped and as if the world as you know it is over. Now imagine feeling like that completely out of nowhere, regularly.

According to the Anxiety and Depression Association of America, “anxiety disorders are the most common mental illness in the U.S., affecting 40 million adults in the United States, or 18.1 percent of the population every year.” And among this 18 percent of the population, about 36 percent receive treatment.

There are many different types and examples of anxiety disorder: post-traumatic stress disorder, general anxiety disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder and forms of depression. Women are more likely to suffer from these forms of anxiety as well. Anxiety disorders affect 25.1 percent of children ages 13 to 18.

Many people do not view mental disorders as serious. They are often quick to note that stress is just a part of the real world. However, with the technological advances of today, we are able to see the strong effect that such a disorder can hold. That people with anxiety may be hit harder by social interactions or criticism than those without.

More people need to become aware of the experiences that people are facing every day. When these disorders become more socially acceptable, the chances of the victims of these disorders feeling more comfortable and stepping forward and receiving treatment will increase. Then they could have more opportunity to live a regular life without such awful side effects, because when it comes down to it, who really wants to be hearing, “something’s wrong, something’s wrong, something’s wrong” constantly?

Katia Bazilchuk

Gorham