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PORTLAND PRESS HERALD DARKROOM
On the Job: Ann Melville, farrier

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    On the Job: Ann Melville, farrier - Whitney Hayward/Staff Photographer | of | Share this photo

    Ann Melville puts on her farrier apron before trimming the hooves of a donkey in Poland named Paco on Sept. 24. Melville became a farrier 17 years ago, after studying entomology in graduate school. "I found out you couldn't make any money in it unless you worked for the pesticide companies," she said.

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    On the Job: Ann Melville, farrier - Whitney Hayward/Staff Photographer | of | Share this photo

    Ann Melville adjusts the fitting of a dressage horse's shoes at Inish Beg farms in Standish on Sept. 24. Melville uses the horse's previous shoes as a template for the new pair, and hammers the shoes from the template into the correct shape.

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    On the Job: Ann Melville, farrier - Whitney Hayward/Staff Photographer | of | Share this photo

    Ann Melville works on a dressage horse named Falco in Standish on Sept. 24. Melville said she enjoys taking her time, and ensuring that Falco is balanced and stable for dressage work.

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    On the Job: Ann Melville, farrier - Whitney Hayward/Staff Photographer | of | Share this photo

    Ann Melville's horseshoe nail carrier, seen on Sept. 24 before she shoed dressage horses in Standish.

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    On the Job: Ann Melville, farrier - Whitney Hayward/Staff Photographer | of | Share this photo

    Ann Melville hot fits a shoe to Falco at Inish Beg farms in Standish. Hot fitting allows an imprint of the horse's hoof to mark on the shoe, to give a farrier a guideline for how the shoe needs to be adjusted. Smoke from hot shoeing inhibits a horse's ability to see clearly, which is why some horses have an aversion to hot fitting. Melville tested Falco's aversion to the process by producing a small amount of smoke away from his hoof.

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    On the Job: Ann Melville, farrier - Whitney Hayward/Staff Photographer | of | Share this photo

    Ann Melville opens the barn door of her client Pamela Ross after trimming her donkeys' hooves. Melville was exposed to horses at a young age, but did not pursue a career with the animals until after graduate school. "My favorite part of being around a horse was always picking up their feet. It's bred into me. I think being a farrier is genetic," Melville said.

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