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PORTLAND PRESS HERALD DARKROOM
GALERY: Arsenal

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    Staff photo by Joe Phelan This May 3 photo shows the Kennebec Arsenal on banks of Kennebec River in Augusta.

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    GALERY: Arsenal - | of | Share this photo

    Staff photo by Joe Phelan The Kennebec Arsenal on banks of Kennebec River in Augusta, shown in this May 3 photo, is among the best and earliest surviving examples of 19th century munitions depots in the country.

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    Staff photo by Joe Phelan This May 3 photo shows the Kennebec Arsenal, a property purchased from the state in 2007 for $280,000 that has yet to be redeveloped.

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    GALERY: Arsenal - Staff photo by Joe Phelan | of | Share this photo

    The city's utilities district recently stopped foreclosure proceedings on the owners of the Kennebec Arsenal for unpaid fees.

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    GALERY: Arsenal - Photo by Elise Klysa | of | Share this photo

    Masons from the Maine School of Masonry in Avon lay mortar Wednesday to repair the gaps between the granite at the Kennebec Arsenal. Shown here are Tyler Garnett, left of Westbrook, William Ellis, back, of Vienna and Malachi Crafts, front, of Farmington.

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    GALERY: Arsenal - Photo by Elise Klysa | of | Share this photo

    Masonry consultant Richard Irons points to gaps in the masonry needing repair at the Kennebec Arsenal on Arsenal Street in Augusta on Wednesday. Irons explains that the masonry breaks down over time due to weather, and without repair, water and moisture seep into the building. A team of masons from the Maine School of Masonry is making repairs to buildings built between 1828 and 1838.

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