In light of the winter weather we have experienced this year, some people have questioned the validity of global warming. Perhaps “climate disruption” would be a better way of understanding what is going on throughout the country, as “climate disruption” doesn’t always mean warming in every location.

Western droughts and wildfires, the Colorado floods, Southern deep freezes, “megastorms” and polar vortexes are all part of a pattern that has been predicted by scientists studying climate change.

The rapid warming and melting of the polar ice cap occurring in the Arctic have led to a weakening of the jet stream, pushing it far to the north in the western part of our continent and dipping down far to the south in the east.

We can expect more severe weather events as this process accelerates. Isn’t it time we consider the long-range consequences of climate change and do everything we can to moderate its impact on future generations?

An excellent summary of the science can be found in the following article on thinkprogress.org: “Hot Alaska, Cold Georgia: How the Shifted Polar Vortex Turned Winter Upside-Down.”

Billy Rixon

Freeport