RIO DE JANEIRO — Undefeated, uncatchable, unquestionably the best.

Usain Bolt bid a blazing-fast farewell to the Rio de Janeiro Games – and likely the Olympics altogether – with yet another anchor leg for the ages Friday night. He turned a close 400-meter relay race against Japan and the United States into a never-a-doubt runaway, helping Jamaica cross the line in 37.27 seconds.

“There you go,” he said. “I am the greatest.”

Japan won the silver medal, finishing .33 seconds behind.

The U.S. finished the race third but endured yet another relay debacle – disqualified because the leadoff runner, Mike Rodgers, passed the baton to Justin Gatlin outside the exchange zone. That promoted Canada to the bronze.

This marked the ninth time since 1995 the U.S. men have been disqualified or failed to get the baton around at Olympics or world championships. That will cause more hand-wringing in the States.

Bolt’s record in Olympic finals: Nine races, nine wins. Nobody’s done that before, and nobody’s on the horizon to do it soon.

Along with Bolt for his final trip down the track were Nickel Ashmeade, training partner Yohan Blake and the Jamaican elder statesman, former world-record holder Asafa Powell.

When Bolt received the yellow baton from Ashmeade for his final run down the straightaway, he was even, maybe a step behind Aska Cambridge of Japan and Trayvon Bromell of the United States.

That lasted about four steps.

With 70 meters to go, it was all over. Bolt looked at the clock, as he did when he finished the 200-meter win the night before.

No world record, but he still has a piece of that one, too – it’s 36.84 seconds, set four years ago at the London Games.

“I am just relieved. It’s happened. I am just happy, proud of myself. It’s come true,” Bolt said. “The pressure is real. I look at it as an accomplishment.”

After crossing the line for his finale, Bolt pumped his fist in the air, slowed down and took off those famous gold spikes. He huddled with his teammates and they prayed. Then he took a final luxurious lap around the track.

“I’ll stay up late tonight,” Bolt said when asked how he’d celebrate.

But before he left the track, his partners peeled off from the victory lap. With the stadium emptying, Bolt kneeled down, brought his hands out to his sides and soaked in one last burst of applause. Then he kissed the track and slapped his hand on the number “3” painted at the starting line. As in three Olympics, three races at each, three gold medals each time.

He could have just as easily slapped the number “1.”

That would need no explanation.