February 25

Harold Ramis, beloved actor, writer, director, dead at 69

He gave us such comedies as ‘Groundhog Day,’ ‘Analyze This,’ ‘Ghostbusters,' 'Animal House' and 'Caddyshack.'

By Mark Caro
Chicago Tribune

CHICAGO — Harold Ramis was one of Hollywood’s most successful comedy filmmakers when he moved his family from Los Angeles back to the Chicago area in 1996. His career was still thriving, with “Groundhog Day” acquiring almost instant classic status upon its 1993 release and 1984’s “Ghostbusters” ranking among the highest-grossing comedies of all time, but the writer-director wanted to return to the city where he’d launched his career as a Second City performer.

click image to enlarge

Film director Harold Ramis stands on North Michigan Avenue in Chicago.

2009 File Photo/Chris Walker/Chicago Tribune

“There’s a pride in what I do that other people share because I’m local, which in L.A. is meaningless; no one’s local,” Ramis said upon the launch of the first movie he directed after his move, the 1999 mobster-in-therapy comedy “Analyze This,” another hit. “It’s a good thing. I feel like I represent the city in a certain way.”

Ramis died early Monday morning after a long illness, according to his wife, Erica Mann Ramis. He was 69.

Ramis’ serious health struggles began in May 2010 after he underwent surgery for diverticulitis and suffered complications related to the autoimmune disease. Unable to walk, he spent four months that year at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., before continuing work at the Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago.

A year and a half later, Ramis had relearned to walk and was making good progress on his recovery when he suffered a relapse of the vasculitis, from which he never fully recovered, said Laurel Ward, vice president of development at Ramis’ Ocean Pictures production company.

A FORMIDABLE BODY OF WORK

Ramis leaves behind a formidable body of work, with writing credits on such enduring comedies as “National Lampoon’s Animal House” (which upon its 1978 release launched the film career of John Belushi, a former Second City castmate of Ramis’), “Stripes” (1981) and “Ghostbusters” (in which Ramis also co-starred) plus such directing efforts as “Caddyshack” (1980), “National Lampoon’s Vacation” (1983), “Groundhog Day” and “Analyze This.”

Previously he was the first head writer (and a performer) on Second City’s groundbreaking television series “Second City Television (SCTV)” (1976-79). More recently he directed episodes of NBC’s “The Office.”

“When I was 15, I interviewed Harold for my high school radio station, and he was the person that I wanted to be when I was growing up,” said filmmaker Judd Apatow, who later would cast Ramis as Seth Rogen’s father in “Knocked Up” and would produce Ramis’ final movie, “Year One” (1999). “His work is the reason why so many of us got into comedy. We grew up on ‘Second City TV’ and ‘Ghostbusters,’ ‘Vacation,’ ‘Animal House,’ ‘Stripes,’ ‘Meatballs’ (which Ramis co-wrote); he literally made every single one of our favorite movies.”

Ramis also left behind a reputation as a mensch, mentor and all-around good guy.

“He’s the least changed by success of anyone I know in terms of sense of humor, of humility, sense of self,” the late Second City founder Bernie Sahlins, who began working with Ramis there in 1969, said of him in 1999. “He’s the same Harold he was 30 years ago. He’s had enormous success relatively, but none of it has gone to his head in any way.”

Ward, who worked with Ramis for 15 years, called him “the world’s best mentor.” She recalled that when she first began working for him as his assistant in Chicago, he had to go to California for a month, and he told her that although he didn’t need an assistant out there, she should go anyway because it would be a good experience for her. He made sure her expenses were covered.

“He just did it for me,” she said. “He loved teaching people. He loved helping people. He loved seeing people succeed.”

(Continued on page 2)

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