May 5, 2011

BLACKOUT: President says U.S. won't release death photos of Osama bin Laden

They could look like gloating, and 'that's not who we are' as a country, Obama explains.

By ERICA WERNER and KIMBERLY DOZIER The Associated Press

WASHINGTON - President Obama ordered grisly photographs of a slain Osama bin Laden sealed from public view Wednesday, declaring, "We don't need to spike the football" in triumph after this week's daring middle-of-the-night raid.

See more photographs, videos and related Osama bin Laden coverage.

The terrorist leader was killed by American commandos who burst into his room and, fearing he was reaching for a nearby weapon, shot him in the head and chest, U.S. officials said.

Several weapons were found in the room where the terror chief died, including AK-47 assault rifles and side arms, the officials said. They spoke on condition of anonymity as they offered the most recent in a series of increasingly detailed and sometimes-shifting accounts of bin Laden's final minutes after a decade on the run.

Obama said releasing the photographs taken by the Navy SEAL raiders was "not who we are" as a country. Though some may deny his death, "the fact of the matter is you will not see bin Laden walking this Earth again," the president said in an interview taped for CBS' "60 Minutes."

"It's important for us to make sure that very graphic photos of somebody who was shot in the head are not floating around as an incitement to additional violence or as a propaganda tool," Obama said.

White House press secretary Jay Carney said the president's decision applied to photographs of bin Laden, said to show a portion of his skull blown away from a gunshot wound to the area of his left eye, as well as to a video recording of his burial several hours later in the North Arabian Sea.

The president made no public remarks during the day about the raid, apart from the taped interview. But he arranged to visit ground zero today in Manhattan, where the World Trade Center twin towers once stood.

After two days of shifting accounts of the dramatic raid, Carney said he would no longer provide details of the 40-minute operation by the team of elite Navy SEALs. That left numerous unresolved mysteries, prominent among them an exact accounting of bin Laden's demise. Officials have said he was unarmed, but resisted when an unknown number of commandos burst into his room inside the high-security compound.

The officials who gave the latest details said a U.S. commando grabbed a woman who charged toward the SEALs inside the room. They said the raiders were concerned that she might be wearing a suicide vest.

Administration officials have said bin Laden's body was identified by several means, including a DNA test. Members of Congress who received a briefing during the day said a sample from the body killed at the compound in Pakistan was compared to known DNA from bin Laden's mother and three sons.

After two days of speculation about releasing the photographs, there was no detectable public debate in the U.S. about the merits of the raid itself against the man behind the terror attacks that killed nearly 3,000 Americans on Sept. 11, 2001.

Attorney General Eric Holder told Congress the operation was "entirely lawful and consistent with our values" and justified as "an action of national self-defense." Noting that bin Laden had admitted his involvement in the events of nearly a decade ago, he said, "It's lawful to target an enemy commander in the field."

Holder also said the team that carried out the raid had been trained to take bin Laden alive if he was willing to surrender. "It was a kill-or-capture mission," Holder said. "He made no attempt to surrender."

Bin Laden had evaded capture for nearly a decade, and officials said he had currency as well as two telephone numbers sewn into his clothing when he was killed, suggesting he was prepared to leave his surroundings on a moment's notice if he sensed danger.

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